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dc.contributor.advisorHudson, Fraser Berkleyeng
dc.contributor.authorSpivey, Whitney Jacksoneng
dc.coverage.spatialUnited Stateseng
dc.coverage.spatialTexas -- Austineng
dc.coverage.temporal1900-1999eng
dc.date.issued2010eng
dc.date.submitted2010 Springeng
dc.descriptionTitle from PDF of title page (University of Missouri--Columbia, viewed on June 21, 2010).eng
dc.descriptionThe entire thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file; a non-technical public abstract appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionThesis advisor: Dr. Berkley Hudson.eng
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.descriptionM.A. University of Missouri--Columbia 2010.eng
dc.descriptionDissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- Journalism.eng
dc.description.abstractThe Texas Posten, Austin's weekly Swedish-language newspaper, was in its 18th year when world war erupted in Europe. Like many Americans around the country, Texas Swedes heeded President Wilson's words of neutrality and later his encouragement of the Allied cause. When the United States entered the war in April 1917, the federal government kept a watchful eye on foreign-language publications. Censorship legislation was passed, including the Espionage and Trading-with-the-Enemy acts, and the Committee on Public Information was established to blanket America - and the world - with patriotic propaganda. This study examined nine years (468 issues) of the Texas Posten to determine how the paper responded to the First World War - particularly the propaganda movement and censorship regulations enacted by the federal government. The importance of the study rested in the fact that the Posten was one of the few foreign-language newspapers to successfully comply with the wishes of the federal government and thrive during an era when the majority of similar publications met their deaths. The geographic location, religious views, political opinions and integration into the established community of Texas Swedes allowed them to consider World War I more patriotically than Swedes in many other areas of the country.eng
dc.format.extentvi, 134 pageseng
dc.identifier.merlinb79430727eng
dc.identifier.oclc649060039eng
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/8120
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/8120
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartof2010 Freely available theses (MU)eng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertations. Theses. 2010 Theseseng
dc.subject.lcshTexas posteneng
dc.subject.lcshPress and propagandaeng
dc.subject.lcshWorld War, 1914-1918eng
dc.subject.lcshFreedom of the presseng
dc.subject.lcshTrading with the enemyeng
dc.subject.lcshEspionage -- Historyeng
dc.subject.lcshSwedish newspapers -- Objectivityeng
dc.titleThe patriotic impact of World War I on the Texas Posten, a Swedish-language newspapereng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineJournalism (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelMasterseng
thesis.degree.nameM.A.eng


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