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dc.contributor.advisorCook, Cristi Reeves.eng
dc.contributor.authorWall, Corey R. (Corey Robert)eng
dc.date.issued2010eng
dc.date.submitted2010 Springeng
dc.descriptionThe entire dissertation/thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file (which also appears in the research.pdf); a non-technical general description, or public abstract, appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionTitle from PDF of title page (University of Missouri--Columbia, viewed on July 14, 2010).eng
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.descriptionThesis advisor: Cristi R. Cook.eng
dc.description"May 2010"eng
dc.descriptionM.S. University of Missouri-Columbia 2010.eng
dc.descriptionDissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- Veterinary biomedical sciences.eng
dc.description.abstract[ACCESS RESTRICTED TO THE UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI AT AUTHOR'S REQUEST.] Over the last several years, papers have been published describing imaging techniques for the canine shoulder joint using both ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging, with osteochondrosis lesions being described to varying degrees. This prospective study directly compared radiographs, ultrasound, and magnetic resonance imaging, to arthroscopic findings of a larger, clinically affected, population of dogs with osteochondral lesions. The findings of this study determined the diagnostic accuracy of radiographic, ultrasonographic, and magnetic resonance imaging in canine shoulder osteochondrosis. These findings enable the clinician to objectively choose the most effective imaging modality or modalities in order to obtain a comprehensive and accurate diagnosis of shoulder osteochondrosis to help determine and plan surgical treatment. The amount of information needed will depend on the patient, the surgeon and the surgical technique utilized for the treatment of canine shoulder osteochondrosis. Overall magnetic resonance imaging had the strongest correlation to the surgically identified lesion. A sagittal T2 or PD FAT SAT magnetic resonance sequence was the most useful modality at ruling out an osteochondral lesion and can be used to avoid an exploratory arthroscopic surgery of the canine shoulder.eng
dc.format.extentviii, 70 pageseng
dc.identifier.merlinb77174628eng
dc.identifier.oclc647786605eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/8131
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/8131eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri-Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartof2010 MU restricted theses (MU)eng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertations. Theses. 2010 Theseseng
dc.rightsAccess is limited to the campus of the University of Missouri--Columbia.eng
dc.subject.lcshOsteochondrosis -- Imagingeng
dc.subject.lcshDogs -- Diseases -- Diagnosiseng
dc.subject.lcshShoulder -- Ultrasonic imagingeng
dc.subject.lcshShoulder -- Magnetic resonance imagingeng
dc.subject.lcshShoulder -- Radiographyeng
dc.subject.lcshVeterinary diagnostic imagingeng
dc.titleComparative imaging of canine shoulder osteochondrosis lesionseng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineVeterinary biomedical sciences (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelMasterseng
thesis.degree.nameM.S.eng


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