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dc.contributor.advisorOverby, L. Marvineng
dc.contributor.advisorEndersby, James W. (James Webster), 1958-eng
dc.contributor.authorSpillson, Christine A.eng
dc.coverage.spatialVirginiaeng
dc.coverage.spatialUnited Stateseng
dc.date.issued2010eng
dc.date.submitted2010 Springeng
dc.descriptionTitle from PDF of title page (University of Missouri--Columbia, viewed on June 29, 2010).eng
dc.descriptionThe entire thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file; a non-technical public abstract appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionThesis advisor: Dr. L.M. Overby and Dr. James Endersby.eng
dc.descriptionM.A. University of Missouri--Columbia 2010.eng
dc.description.abstract[ACCESS RESTRICTED TO THE UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI AT REQUEST OF AUTHOR.] Radio has long been used as a piece of a political candidate's media arsenal at every level of politics. However, our understanding of this widely used, versatile medium has been lacking since a large part of the research on campaign advertising has focused solely on television or has combined radio and television as if they were not two distinct and independent mediums for advertising. The value of radio in a political candidates campaign can be measured in dollars saved in having fewer TV spots and the benefit of being able to reach targeted audiences by using the advertising method of narrowcasting. We know that narrowcasting occurs in an election but there has been little research to show how it is done in a campaign and who is targeted. This paper examines the ads created for Tim Kaine for the 2005 Virginia gubernatorial election. Using a content analysis of the advertisements created for both television and radio this paper shows how groups of radio ads are substantively different than those created for television and that they are intended to address a specified audience. By reaching targeted audiences on the radio the candidate is able to use television to appear more moderate and sidestep speaking about controversial topics in TV ads created for the general electorate.eng
dc.description.bibrefIncludes bibliographical referenceseng
dc.format.extentiv, 54 pageseng
dc.identifier.merlinb79531416eng
dc.identifier.oclc650090611eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/8142
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/8142eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertationseng
dc.rightsAccess is limited to the campuses of the University of Missouri.eng
dc.subject.lcshKaine, Timothy Meng
dc.subject.lcshRadio advertisingeng
dc.subject.lcshAdvertising, Politicaleng
dc.subject.lcshGovernors -- Electionseng
dc.subject.lcshPolitical campaignseng
dc.titleChanneling the waves : the use of radio narrowcasting on niche voting groups in the 2005 Virginia gubernatorial electioneng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplinePolitical science (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelMasterseng
thesis.degree.nameM.A.eng


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