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dc.contributor.advisorWasher, Glenn A.eng
dc.contributor.authorFenwick, Richard Grahameng
dc.date.issued2010eng
dc.date.submitted2010 Springeng
dc.descriptionThe entire thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file; a non-technical public abstract appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionTitle from PDF of title page (University of Missouri--Columbia, viewed on June 22, 2010).eng
dc.descriptionThesis advisor: Dr. Glenn Washer.eng
dc.descriptionM.S. University of Missouri--Columbia 2010.eng
dc.description.abstract[ACCESS RESTRICTED TO THE UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI AT REQUEST OF AUTHOR.] This study investigated the application of infrared (IR) thermography for the detection of subsurface damage in concrete. The deterioration of concrete as a result of corrosion of embedded reinforcing steel is a widespread problem. Cracking in the concrete that develops at a subsurface level manifests as delaminations that lead to spalling. These delaminations develop due to the expansion of the reinforcing steel during corrosion processes, and as such typically occur at the level of the reinforcing steel mat. As a result, this deterioration is not observable during typical visual inspections, and nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques such as thermography are needed to detect this deterioration in its early stages, when mitigation and repair strategies can be effective. Thermography relies on ambient environmental conditions to induce thermal gradients in the concrete that are necessary to make subsurface features observable in a thermal image. The objective of this study was to characterize the environmental conditions that enable the detection of subsurface defects in concrete bridges, and evaluate the effects of environmental parameters such as diurnal temperature variations, humidity and wind speed. The study focused on concrete surfaces not exposed to radiant heating from the sun to develop data to support guidelines for the application of IR imaging for detecting subsurface defects in concrete. A large concrete test block was constructed with embedded Styrofoam targets at various depths to simulate the effects of a subsurface delamination in the concrete. The surface temperature variations of the block were monitored continuously over a period of three months with a thermographic camera, and recorded together with onsite weather station data.eng
dc.description.bibrefIncludes bibliographical referenceseng
dc.format.extentxiv, 161 pageseng
dc.identifier.merlinb79531210eng
dc.identifier.oclc649842908eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/8149
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/8149eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertationseng
dc.rightsAccess is limited to the campuses of the University of Missouri.eng
dc.subject.lcshConcrete bridges -- Crackingeng
dc.subject.lcshConcrete -- Corrosioneng
dc.subject.lcshConcrete -- Deteriorationeng
dc.subject.lcshConcrete bridges -- Maintenance and repaireng
dc.subject.lcshConcrete bridges -- Thermal properties -- Testingeng
dc.titleEnvironmental effects on subsurface defect detection in concrete without solar loadeng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineCivil engineering (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelMasterseng
thesis.degree.nameM.S.eng


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