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dc.contributor.advisorMacGregor, Cynthiaeng
dc.contributor.authorGross, Tracy L.eng
dc.date.issued2020eng
dc.date.submitted2020 Falleng
dc.descriptionIncludes vita.eng
dc.description.abstract"There are not enough teachers (Ingersoll, 2001; Ingersoll and Smith, 2003; Sutcher, et al., 2016). Focusing on retention is crucial to combatting shortages (Darling-Hammond, 2003); it is critical to specifically target retention of the very best teachers, who leave the profession at a greater rate and impact student learning the most (Jacob et al., 2012). Supporting teacher growth is a strategy to increase retention by providing career development, which improves working conditions, ultimately leading to increases in job satisfaction for teachers. Teacher self-efficacy and reflective practice are both related to teacher retention (Yost, 2006). Teacher self-efficacy is known to be a protective factor against burnout (Aloe et al., 2014; Brown, 2012; Brouwers et al., 2001; Cherniss, 1993; Schwerdtfeger, et al., 2008; Skaalvik and Skaalvik, 2007; Skaalvik and Skaalvik, 2010; Tschannen-Moran, et al., 1998) and is positively related to teacher retention (Kelley, 2004; Yost, 2006). Engaging in reflection with reflective supervision is correlated with desire for improvement and job satisfaction (Priddis and Rogers, 2018), both of which are connected to teacher retention. Missouri Teacher Academy is a state-level initiative designed to support teacher retention. The program content focuses on instructional strategies and student engagement, which are aligned to two of the dimensions measured by the TSES (Tschannen-Moran and Woolfolk Hoy, 2001). Additionally, the program emphasizes reflective practice, which has been found to be positively related to teacher self-efficacy (Babaei and Abednia, 2016). Given the relationship between teacher retention and self-efficacy (Kelley, 2004; Yost, 2006), program impacts on these two important constructs should be evaluated. The TSES (Tschannen-Moran and Woolfolk Hoy, 2001) and the RPQ (Priddis and Rogers, 2018; Rogers et al., 2019) were used to measure levels of participant self-efficacy and reflective capacity. The RPQ has not been used in an educational context, and this study may add to the body of research regarding the application of this tool across multiple disciplines. The results of this study may be used to inform future program and policy decisions regarding Missouri Teacher Academy."--from Summaryeng
dc.description.bibrefIncludes bibliographical referenceseng
dc.format.extentvii, 200 pages ; illustrations (some colored)eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/81522
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10-32469/10355/81522eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertationseng
dc.rightsOpenAccesseng
dc.rights.licenseThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 License. Copyright held by author.
dc.titleBuilding the best : a quantitative evaluation of a state-level teacher retention strategy designed to increase self-efficacy, reflective capacity, and job satisfaction through effective professional developmenteng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineEducational leadership and policy analysis (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelDoctoraleng
thesis.degree.nameEd. D.eng


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