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dc.contributor.authorHelsel, Zane R., 1949-eng
dc.contributor.authorHelsel, Diana Geng
dc.coverage.spatialMissourieng
dc.date.issued1993eng
dc.description.abstractMissouri's growing season is characterized by excessive moisture in the spring followed by inadequate moisture during the middle of the growing season. Because of the lack of moisture during the crops' peak demand, some producers have invested in irrigation systems. The cost of maintaining and using these systems is high, so it is imperative to manage moisture in the most efficient way possible. The following discussion should help Missouri soybean producers understand the crop's need, the soil's ability to hold and supply water, and the agronomic practices that can result in maximum economic yields under irrigation.eng
dc.identifier.otherG-04420-1993eng
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/8214
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Extension Divisioneng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Extensioneng
dc.relation.ispartofseriesG - Agricultural Guides (University of Missouri--Columbia. Extension) ; 04420 (1993)eng
dc.rightsArchive version. For the most recent information see extension.missouri.edu.eng
dc.rightsOpenAccess.eng
dc.rights.licenseThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 License.
dc.sourceHarvested from the University of Missouri--Columbia Extension website.eng
dc.subjectresponse to irrigation ; weather patterns ; crop water use ; maximizing irrigated yieldseng
dc.subject.lcshSoybean -- Irrigationeng
dc.titleIrrigating soybeans (1993)eng
dc.typeDocumenteng


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