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dc.contributor.advisorValentine, Jerryeng
dc.contributor.authorGauzy, Susan, 1954-eng
dc.coverage.spatialMissourieng
dc.date.issued2010eng
dc.date.submitted2010 Springeng
dc.descriptionTitle from PDF of title page (University of Missouri--Columbia, viewed on May 25, 2010).eng
dc.descriptionThe entire thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file; a non-technical public abstract appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionDissertation advisor: Dr. Jerry Valentine.eng
dc.descriptionVita.eng
dc.descriptionEd. D. University of Missouri--Columbia 2010.eng
dc.description.abstractThis exploratory study examined the relationship between superintendents' perceived sense of urgency and student academic performance. More specifically, the study examined the leadership of Missouri superintendents based upon a district's Annual Performance Report. The Missouri Annual Performance Report ranks districts from highest to lowest with the following designations: performance with distinction; full waiver; limited waiver; provisionally accredited; and, unaccredited. This study focused only on the sense of urgency in the districts performing with distinction, performing with a full waiver, and performing with a limited waiver due to limited sample size in the lower levels of provisionally accredited and unaccredited. A total of 98 superintendents in Missouri were included in this study. Quantitative data were collected using survey responses. Superintendents responded to items about their perceptions of their own sense of urgency to improve student academic performance, the source of their urgency, their purposeful communication of urgency, their perceptions of change of urgency in district stakeholders, and the strategies used to communicate the urgency. Data from the surveys were analyzed using analysis of variance, analysis of covariance, and step-wise linear regression. Superintendents in districts performing with a limited waiver reported a significantly stronger sense of urgency to improve student academic performance than did superintendents in districts performing with distinction at the end of the first year in their position as superintendent. Superintendents in districts with a limited waiver also reported a significantly stronger sense of urgency to improve student academic performance than did superintendents in districts performing with distinction at the time of the survey. Superintendents in districts with a limited waiver purposefully communicated significantly more often than superintendents in districts performing with distinction with boards of education. In addition, superintendents in districts with a limited waiver purposefully communicated significantly more frequently with all district teachers than superintendents in districts performing with distinction. Superintendents leading districts performing with a limited waiver and superintendents leading districts with a full waiver identified an impending crisis to communicate a sense of urgency to improve student academic performance significantly more often than superintendents leading districts performing with distinction. Through regression analysis, Providing Opportunities for Success, Identifying an Impending Crisis, Setting Goals and Targets, and Utilizing Data were communication strategies significantly associated with the degree to which the sense of urgency to improve student academic performance increased throughout the district. Regression findings also implied that utilizing the communication strategy "providing opportunities for success" could increase the sense of urgency for boards of education, district administrators, building principals, teacher leaders, all district teachers and the media. Throughout this study it was evident that superintendents leading districts with a limited waiver, which indicates lower student academic performance, reported a stronger sense of urgency to improve student achievement than did their counterparts in higher performing districts. These superintendents purposefully communicated a sense of urgency more often and they used the communication strategy of "identifying an impending crisis" more frequently to increase a sense of urgency across their districts than did superintendents in districts with higher student performance. In addition, when superintendents utilize the communication strategy of "providing opportunities for success," which includes actions such as articulating a vision and implementing a purposeful school improvement process, an increase in a sense of urgency to improve student achievement is more likely to occur.eng
dc.description.bibrefIncludes bibliographical referenceseng
dc.format.extentxv, 205 pageseng
dc.identifier.merlinb77800035eng
dc.identifier.oclc652792560eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/8290
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/8290eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertationseng
dc.rightsOpenAccess.eng
dc.rights.licenseThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 License.
dc.subject.lcshPerformance contracts in educationeng
dc.subject.lcshLearning contractseng
dc.subject.lcshAcademic achievementeng
dc.subject.lcshStudents -- Academic workloadeng
dc.subject.lcshSchool superintendentseng
dc.titleMissouri superintendents' perception of a sense of urgency to improve student academic performanceeng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineEducational leadership and policy analysis (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelDoctoraleng
thesis.degree.nameEd. D.eng


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