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dc.contributor.advisorWanta, Wayneeng
dc.contributor.authorHeim, Kyle, 1966-eng
dc.coverage.spatialUnited Stateseng
dc.coverage.temporal2008eng
dc.date.issued2010eng
dc.date.submitted2010 Springeng
dc.descriptionTitle from PDF of title page (University of Missouri--Columbia, viewed on May 25, 2010).eng
dc.descriptionThe entire thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file; a non-technical public abstract appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionDissertation advisor: Dr. Wayne Wanta.eng
dc.descriptionVita.eng
dc.descriptionPh. D. University of Missouri--Columbia 2010.eng
dc.description.abstractThis study analyzes intermedia agenda setting during the 2008 U.S. presidential campaign to determine the agenda-setting role of prominent political bloggers in relation to the mainstream news media and the candidates. An online survey of newspaper and wire service reporters who covered the campaign (N = 80) found that reporters who wrote about the campaign on a regular basis and who contributed to a blog on their news organizations' Websites had higher levels of exposure to political blogs. Reporters with low levels of journalism experience and reporters based in Washington, D.C., were more likely to say that political blogs helped satisfy their informational needs during the campaign, confirming that need for orientation, consisting of the lower-order concepts of uncertainty and relevance, can be applied to intermedia agenda setting. A separate conceptualization of reporters' need for orientation toward issues, toward frames, and toward evaluations found little support. A content analysis of political blog posts, news articles, and candidate press releases from the month preceding the 2008 Iowa Democratic caucuses found that political blogs' issue and attribute agendas were strongly correlated with the agendas of the news media, but in both cases, bloggers mostly appeared to follow the news media's lead. Some evidence was found, however, that the issue agenda of liberal bloggers during the first week transferred to the news media in subsequent weeks. No evidence of intermedia agenda setting between the candidates and the political blogs was found.eng
dc.description.bibrefIncludes bibliographical referenceseng
dc.format.extentx, 234 pageseng
dc.identifier.merlinb77813492eng
dc.identifier.oclc653244162eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/8321
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/8321eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertationseng
dc.rightsOpenAccess.eng
dc.rights.licenseThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 License.
dc.subject.lcshCitizen journalismeng
dc.subject.lcshPresidents -- Electioneng
dc.subject.lcshPolitical campaigns -- Blogseng
dc.subject.lcshMass media -- Political aspectseng
dc.titleThe boys on the blogs : intermedia agenda setting in the 2008 U.S. presidential campaigneng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineJournalism (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelDoctoraleng
thesis.degree.namePh. D.eng


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