[-] Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorRedel, Jacob M.eng
dc.contributor.authorSchroder, Amy L.eng
dc.contributor.authorHurrelmeyer, Katherine E.eng
dc.contributor.authorTaylor, Julia A.eng
dc.contributor.authorSharpe-Timms, Kathy L.eng
dc.contributor.corporatenameUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. Office of Undergraduate Researcheng
dc.contributor.meetingnameSummer Undergraduate Research and Creative Achievements Forum (2006 : University of Missouri--Columbia)eng
dc.date.issued2006eng
dc.descriptionFaculty Mentor: Dr. Susan C. Nagel, Obstetrics/Gynecology, and Women's Healtheng
dc.descriptionAbstract only availableeng
dc.description.abstractEndometriosis is a common medical condition affecting 5-10% of women worldwide, and results in severe cramps, pelvic pain, and infertility. The cause of the disease is still unknown. Endometriosis occurs when endometrial tissue, which escapes into the peritoneal cavity via retrograde menstruation, adheres to other tissues in the cavity and causes irritated, inflamed lesions. Studies have suggested that the risk of developing endometriosis increases in women who have been exposed to xenobiotic (foreign to the body) estrogens during developmental stages of life. Thus, it is our hypothesis that programming of the immune system by xenoestrogens during development could potentially exacerbate endometriosis. This could occur by altering the peritoneal environment and/or the invading endometrial tissue. Therefore, it is our goal to study the effects of neonatal xenoestrogen exposure on the immune system; and ultimately, on the establishment of endometriosis in adulthood. In order to study this response, we dosed two strains of mice (CD1 and C57) with xenobiotic estrogens on postnatal days 2-14. In experiment A, CD1 mice were dosed with vehicle control (corn oil), 20 µg/kg/day, or 200 µg/kg/day bisphenol A. In experiment B, C57 mice were dosed with a vehicle control (corn oil) or 0.1 µg/kg/day diethylstilbestrol. At 8 weeks of age, endometriosis was induced in each strain via both a surgical induction and an injection technique. At 12 weeks, the endometriotic implants were counted and weighed to determine which mice had a greater susceptibility to the condition. Our next objective will be to analyze peritoneal fluid from the treated mice to identify key immune functions (for example, the release of certain cytokines) that may have been programmed by developmental xenoestrogen exposure.eng
dc.description.abstractEndometriosis is a common medical condition affecting 5-10% of women worldwide, and results in severe cramps, pelvic pain, and infertility.  The cause of the disease is still unknown.  Endometriosis occurs when endometrial tissue, which escapes into the peritoneal cavity via retrograde menstruation, adheres to other tissues in the cavity and causes irritated, inflamed lesions.  Studies have suggested that the risk of developing endometriosis increases in women who have been exposed to xenobiotic (foreign to the body) estrogens during developmental stages of life.  Thus, it is our hypothesis that programming of the immune system by xenoestrogens during development could potentially exacerbate endometriosis.  This could occur by altering the peritoneal environment and/or the invading endometrial tissue.  Therefore, it is our goal to study the effects of neonatal xenoestrogen exposure on the immune system; and ultimately, on the establishment of endometriosis in adulthood.  In order to study this response, we dosed two strains of mice (CD1 and C57) with xenobiotic estrogens on postnatal days 2-14.  In experiment A, CD1 mice were dosed with vehicle control (corn oil), 20 µg/kg/day, or 200 µg/kg/day bisphenol A.  In experiment B, C57 mice were dosed with a vehicle control (corn oil) or 0.1 µg/kg/day diethylstilbestrol.  At 8 weeks of age, endometriosis was induced in each strain via both a surgical induction and an injection technique.  At 12 weeks, the endometriotic implants were counted and weighed to determine which mice had a greater susceptibility to the condition.  Our next objective will be to analyze peritoneal fluid from the treated mice to identify key immune functions (for example, the release of certain cytokines) that may have been programmed by developmental xenoestrogen exposure.eng
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/841eng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Office of Undergraduate Researcheng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. Office of Undergraduate Research. Undergraduate Research and Creative Achievements Forumeng
dc.source.urihttp://undergradresearch.missouri.edu/forums-conferences/abstracts/abstract-detail.php?abstractid=681eng
dc.subjectendometriosiseng
dc.subjectxenobiotic estrogeneng
dc.titleNeonatal exposure to xenobiotic estrogen alters the adult immune response and exacerbates endometriosis in mice [abstract]eng
dc.typeAbstracteng


Files in this item

[PDF]

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

[-] Show simple item record