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dc.contributor.advisorPhillips, Ronald G.eng
dc.contributor.authorSchwabrow Dostal, Lynseyeng
dc.coverage.spatialMissourieng
dc.date.issued2010eng
dc.date.submitted2010 Springeng
dc.descriptionTitle from PDF of title page (University of Missouri--Columbia, viewed on September 7, 2010)eng
dc.descriptionThesis advisor: Dr. Ronald Phillips.eng
dc.descriptionVita.eng
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.descriptionPh. D. University of Missouri--Columbia 2010.eng
dc.descriptionDissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- Architectural studies.eng
dc.description.abstract[ACCESS RESTRICTED TO THE UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI AT AUTHOR'S REQUEST.] This dissertation explored the concept of part-time schedules for children in campus child care centers as a challenge faced by administrators. A baseline of data was established identifying challenges associated with offering part-time schedules from an administrator's perspective and the relative importance of the challenges to the successful operation of a center. Multiattribute utility theory (MAUT) is presented as an effective approach to decision making in this context as needs of various stakeholders can be quantitatively evaluated to inform change. A sample of nine administrators participated by completing a one-hour interview and a subsequent survey asking respondents to rank challenges faced as a result of children attending their center on a part-time schedule. Demographic information was collected for comparative purposes, and four open-ended questions served to add depth to the study and aid in further understanding the quantified challenges faced by administrators. Results included the identification of 39 challenges faced by administrators of campus child care centers as a result of allowing children to attend on a part-time schedule. Ranked results indicated a clear tug-of-war between carrying out a high-quality level of care and meeting the scheduling and affordability needs of student-parents. Overall, frequently cited challenges of part-time schedules for children in a campus child care context by administrators included communication, finances, transitions, individual differences, and missed opportunities. Implications suggest that when campus child care centers offer part-time schedules of care for children, challenges exist that may threaten the mission of the center and subsequently the children's ability to develop healthy socioemotional skills, a relationship with the environment, and coping skills.eng
dc.format.extentviii, 125 pageseng
dc.identifier.merlinb77877597eng
dc.identifier.oclc662475135eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/8428
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/8428eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcollectionUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertationseng
dc.rightsAccess is limited to the campus of the University of Missouri-Columbia.eng
dc.subject.lcshCampus-based child careeng
dc.subject.lcshChild care -- Government policyeng
dc.subject.lcshDay care centers -- Law and legislationeng
dc.titlePart-time schedules for children in campus child care centers: a MAUT analysis of challenges faced by administratorseng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineArchitectural studies (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelDoctoraleng
thesis.degree.namePh. D.eng


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