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dc.contributor.advisorDavis, George Edward, 1957-eng
dc.contributor.authorStratman, Amber N., 1983-eng
dc.date.issued2010eng
dc.date.submitted2010 Springeng
dc.descriptionThe entire dissertation/thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file (which also appears in the research.pdf); a non-technical general description, or public abstract, appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionTitle from PDF of title page (University of Missouri--Columbia, viewed on August 3, 2010).eng
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.descriptionVita.eng
dc.descriptionThesis advisor: George E. Davis.eng
dc.description"May 2010"eng
dc.descriptionPh. D. University of Missouri-Columbia 2010.eng
dc.descriptionDissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- physiology (Medicine).eng
dc.description.abstract[ACCESS RESTRICTED TO THE UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI AT AUTHOR'S REQUEST.] From the onset the goal of this thesis work was to determine the role that a novel class of growth factors, i.e. hematopoietic cytokines, was playing in the development of blood vessels both through the processes of vasculogenesis and angiogenesis. To such an end, multiple combinations of hematopoietic cytokines were assessed for their ability to promote EC tube formation, from which the combination of three- SCF, IL-3 and SDF-1[alpha]- were determined to be synergistically acting factors that had the ability to support vascularization. Further, was to determine the molecular role that support cells, such as pericytes, are playing in the stabilization of the vasculature. It has long been known that pericytes are the primary support cells of the microvascular beds, and that disrupted pericyte recruitment leads to a mispatterned, disrupted vasculature. Therefore the molecular role that pericytes are playing to carry out this function becomes critically important. We hypothesized that pericyte recruitment to the endothelium would be required for proper formation of the vascular basement membrane; therefore novel in vitro systems of EC-pericyte tube coassembly, based on signals driven by hematopoietic cytokines, were developed.eng
dc.format.extentviii, 157 pageseng
dc.identifier.merlinb77752600eng
dc.identifier.oclc652971602eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/8433
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/8433eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcollectionUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertationseng
dc.rightsAccess is limited to the campus of the University of Missouri-Columbia.eng
dc.subject.meshHematopoietic Cell Growth Factors -- physiologyeng
dc.subject.meshNeovascularization, Physiologic -- physiologyeng
dc.subject.meshAngiogenesis Inducing Agents -- physiologyeng
dc.subject.meshEndothelium, Vascular -- physiologyeng
dc.subject.meshPericytes -- physiologyeng
dc.titleMolecular mechanisms controlling endothelial cell-pericyte tube coassembly during vascular morphogenesiseng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplinePhysiology (Medicine) (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelDoctoraleng
thesis.degree.namePh. D.eng


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