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dc.contributor.authorCubbage, Frederickeng
dc.contributor.authorBalmelli, Gustavoeng
dc.contributor.authorBussoni, Adrianaeng
dc.contributor.authorNoellemeyer, Elkeeng
dc.contributor.authorPachas, A.eng
dc.contributor.authorFassola, Hugoeng
dc.contributor.authorColcombet, Luiseng
dc.contributor.authorRossner, Beléneng
dc.contributor.authorFrey, Gregoryeng
dc.contributor.authorStevenson, Hayleyeng
dc.contributor.authorHamilton, Jameseng
dc.contributor.authorHubbard, Williameng
dc.contributor.meetingnameNorth American Agroforestry Conference (12th : 2011 : Athens, Ga.)eng
dc.date.issued2011eng
dc.descriptionPaper presented at the 12th North American Agroforesty Conference, which was held June 4-9, 2011 in Athens, Georgia.eng
dc.descriptionIn Ashton, S. F., S.W. Workman, W.G. Hubbard and D.J. Moorhead, eds. Agroforestry: A Profitable Land Use. Proceedings, 12th North American Agroforestry Conference, Athens, GA, June 4-9, 2011.eng
dc.description.abstractSilvopasture systems combine trees, forage and livestock in a variety of different species and management regimes, depending on the biophysical, economic, and social factors in a region. In some regions, culture and tradition cause producers to primarily focus on management of either the livestock and forage or the trees, while in other regions, the focus is on joint production. We describe and compare silvopastoral systems in six regions within five countries of the world: Misiones and Corrientes provinces, Argentina, La Pampa province, Argentina, the Southeast United States, the North Island of New Zealand, Paraguay and Uruguay. This summarizes the biological and social factors that have led to their adoption by farmers and the current status of these systems in each country.eng
dc.description.bibrefIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityFrederick Cubbage (1), Gustavo Balmelli (2), Adriana Bussoni (3), Elke Noellemeyer (4), A. Pachas (5), Hugo Fassola (5), Luis Colcombet (5), Bel�n Rossner (5), Gregory Frey (6), Hayley Stevenson (1), James Hamilton (7) and William Hubbard (8) ; 1. Department of Forestry and Environmental Resources, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, USA. 2. Instituto Nacional de Investigaci�n Agropecuaria, Tacuaremb�, Uruguay. 3. Universidad de la Rep�blica, Montevideo, Uruguay. 4. Universidad Nacional de La Pampa, Santa Rosa, La Pampa, Argentina. 5. INTA EEA Montecarlo, Montecarlo. Misiones, Argentina. 6. World Bank, Washington, D.C. 7. NC Cooperative Extension Service, Watauga County, Boone, North Carolina, USA. 8. Southern Regional Extension Forester, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia, USA.eng
dc.format.extent9 pageseng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/84739
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.subjectSilvopasture, adoption, South America, USA, New Zealandeng
dc.titleComparing silvopastoral systems and prospects in six regions of the worldeng
dc.typePapereng


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