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dc.contributor.authorSchott, Kaia R.
dc.date.issued2021
dc.description.abstractParent self-regulation is thought to be related to their child’s development of self-regulation; for example, by way of coregulation and parenting strategies. The ability to self-regulate prepares a child for school, allows them to form healthy relationships, and to develop socioemotional functioning. The current study assessed the relationship between parent and child self-regulation in a typically- developing sample of parent- child dyads. Data from fifty- two children ages 3- 4 years and their caregivers was utilized, from which we analyzed parent report of their own self regulation using the Me as a Parent scale (Hamilton, Matthews & Crawford, 2014) and a task from a field assessment of child self-regulation (Preschool Self-Regulation Assessment). Surprisingly, high reports of caregiver self-regulation did not indicate greater child self regulation as measured with the balance beam task on the PSRA, which captures cool executive function. Child age was the only variable that had a significant correlation with child self regulation. Although we hypothesized that caregiver self-regulation would predict their child’s, this sample of children had many protective factors. Thus, it appears that within a sample of children with multiple protective factors, parent self-regulation does not vary to a great degree, and that variations in parent self-regulation are not associated with the development of self-regulation within this age range.eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/84808
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri -- Kansas Cityeng
dc.titleAssociations between Caregiver and Child Self- Regulationeng
dc.typeThesiseng


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