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dc.contributor.authorKanagala, Vikrameng
dc.contributor.authorBhandari, Sanjayeng
dc.contributor.authorTaranukha, Tatyanaeng
dc.contributor.authorRein, Lisaeng
dc.contributor.authorBrazauskas, Rutaeng
dc.contributor.authorVenkatesan, Thangameng
dc.date.issued2021-01eng
dc.descriptioneng
dc.description.abstract"Cyclic vomiting syndrome (CVS) is a chronic disorder of gut brain interaction (DGBI) characterized by recurrent episodes of vomiting and is diagnosed with Rome criteria (1). CVS is treated with prophylactic medications such as amitriptyline, which is considered first-line therapy (2, 3). This reduces the frequency of emergency department (ED) visits and hospitalizations (2). However, patients continue to be hospitalized for acute CVS flares. Reasons for CVS-related hospitalizations in these patients are unknown. Multiple causes such as disparities in access to health care, chronic opioid use and chronic marijuana use have been purported (4-6). Hospitalizations in CVS have serious social and economic consequences. They can result in reduced productivity (workdays lost, job loss), and sometimes social problems like divorce (8, 9). In a study using the Nationwide Inpatient Sample, total hospital charges incurred in CVS-related hospitalizations were ~$400 million in 2 years (10). It is crucial to understand risk factors for hospitalizations given the significant impact of CVS on patients and the health care system. The primary aim of our study was to determine risk factors for CVS-related hospitalizations and length of stay (LOS) in patients with CVS. We hypothesized that history of psychiatric comorbidity, chronic opioid use, lack of insurance and African American (AA) ethnicity would increase the risk of hospitalizations."--Introduction.eng
dc.description.bibrefIncludes bibliographical referenceseng
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityVikram Kanagala, MD (1); Sanjay Bhandari, MD (2); Tatyana Taranukha, MD (1); Lisa Rein, PhD (3); Ruta Brazauskas, PhD (3); Thangam Venkatesan, MD1 ; 1. Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Medical College of Wisconsin. 2. Division of General Internal Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Medical College of Wisconsin. 3. Department of Biostatistics, Medical College of Wisconsin.eng
dc.format.extent13 pages : illustrationseng
dc.identifier.citationAm j Hosp Med 2021 Jan;5(1):2021.
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.24150/ajhm/2021.001eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/85087
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri, Department of Medicine, Division of Hospital Medicineeng
dc.relation.ispartofAmerican journal of hospital medicine, volume 5, issue 1 (2021 January-March)eng
dc.relation.ispartofseriesOriginal articleeng
dc.rightsOpenAccess.eng
dc.rights.licenseThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 License.
dc.sourceHarvested from the American Journal of Hospital Medicine website (https://medicine.missouri.edu/departments/medicine/divisions/hospital-medicine/american-journal-of-hospital-medicine) in 2021.eng
dc.subjectCyclic vomiting syndrome || Hospitalization || Length of stay || Non-Caucasian || Opiod useeng
dc.titleNon-Caucasian race, chronic opioid use and lack of insurance or public insurance were predictors of hospitalizations in cyclic vomiting syndromeeng
dc.title.alternativeeng
dc.typeArticleeng


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