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dc.contributor.authorSemelka, Saraeng
dc.contributor.authorHawks, Jacquelineeng
dc.date.issued2010eng
dc.description.abstractSince the mid 1990s, the general revenue funds appropriated for the Department of Corrections has more than tripled, from about $217 million (1994) to about $670 million in 2009. The ripple effects of crime are far reaching: loss of productivity for crime victims and their families, court fees, jail and prison expenses, personal and property damages, and the challenges faced by the children of the incarcerated. All of these carry a hefty monetary and societal price.eng
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/8634
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri-Columbia Center for Family Policy and Researcheng
dc.relation.ispartofUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Center for Family Policy and Researcheng
dc.rightsOpenAccess.eng
dc.rights.licenseThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 License.eng
dc.sourceHarvested from: Center for Family Policy and Research web siteeng
dc.subjectcrime-reduction strategies ; Missouri state prisonseng
dc.subject.lcshEarly childhood educationeng
dc.subject.lcshCrime preventioneng
dc.titlePrevent Crime: Early Childhood Education as a Crime Prevention Tooleng
dc.title.alternativeEarly Childhood Education as a Crime Prevention Tooleng
dc.typeDocumenteng


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