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dc.contributor.authorSpata, Jennifereng
dc.contributor.authorKelsberg, Garyeng
dc.contributor.authorSafranek, Saraheng
dc.date.issued2010-10eng
dc.description.abstractSimply performing spirometry and offering cessation advice doesn't improve quit rates in patients who smoke (strength of recommendation [SOR]: A, systematic review of randomized controlled trials [RCTs]). However, when the spirometry results are communicated in terms of lung age, smokers are more likely to quit (SOR: B, large RCT). Patients with abnormal spirometry results may be more likely to quit than patients with normal results (SOR: B, cohort studies).eng
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Family Practice, 59(10) 2010: 593-594.eng
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/8665eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherFamily Physicians Inquiries Networkeng
dc.relation.ispartofClinical Inquiries, 2010 (MU)eng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. School of Medicine. Department of Family and Community Medicine. Family Physicians Inquiries Networkeng
dc.rightsOpenAccess.eng
dc.rights.licenseThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 License.eng
dc.subjectsmoking cessationeng
dc.subjectlung functioneng
dc.subject.lcshSmoking cessationeng
dc.subject.lcshSpirometryeng
dc.subject.lcshLungs -- Diseases -- Preventioneng
dc.titleDoes office spirometry improve quit rates in smokers?eng
dc.typeArticleeng


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