Women and Feminism in Higher Education Scholarship: An Analysis of Three Core Journals

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Women and Feminism in Higher Education Scholarship: An Analysis of Three Core Journals

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Title: Women and Feminism in Higher Education Scholarship: An Analysis of Three Core Journals
Author: Hart, Jennifer L. (Jennifer Lynn), 1967-
Keywords: female scholars
professionalization theory
Date: 2006
Publisher: The Journal of Higher Education
Citation: The Journal of Higher Education, 77(1), 40-61, 2006.
Abstract: Today, more women than ever before are active participants in higher education. For example, more than 50% of all undergraduate students are women and the numbers of women graduate, professional, and doctoral-degree recipients and faculty are increasing (“The nation,” 2003). In fact, for the first time, American women have earned more doctorates than American men have (Smallwood, 2003). Given this shifting postsecondary climate, more scholarship by women and about women, as well as an increase in feminist scholarship from previous generations, should be part of the discourse. Thus, the purpose of this article is to investigate the academic literature in the field of higher education, using gender and feminism as lenses due, in part, to the increased presence of women in the academy. By analyzing data collected from three leading journals in higher education, The Journal of Higher Education (JHE), The Review of Higher Education (RHE), and Research in Higher Education (ResHE), I hope to better understand how feminist scholarship and how women are treated in the scholarly work contained in these journals.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10355/8848

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