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dc.contributor.advisorGompper, Matthew Edzarteng
dc.contributor.authorOlifiers, Natalie, 1978-eng
dc.coverage.spatialBrazileng
dc.date.issued2010eng
dc.date.submitted2010 Summereng
dc.descriptionTitle from PDF of title page (University of Missouri--Columbia, viewed on August 23, 2010).eng
dc.descriptionThe entire thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file; a non-technical public abstract appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionDissertation advisor: Dr. Matthew Gompper.eng
dc.descriptionVita.eng
dc.descriptionPh. D. University of Missouri--Columbia 2010.eng
dc.description.abstractInfectious diseases can be significant threats to public health and wildlife. Yet, there is still a relatively poor understanding of the impact parasites have on the health and demography of wild hosts. Understanding the effects of parasites on hosts requires not only knowledge about the parasites themselves, but also about the ecology of their hosts. This dissertation was developed with this aim in mind. The first and second chapters regard, respectively, the development of a tool for aging coatis (Nasua nasua: Linnaeus, 1766) and the crab-eating fox (Cerdocyon thous; Linnaeus, 1766) and the collection of basic information on the life-history of these species in the Brazilian Pantanal. In the third chapter, I focus on ectoparasites of coatis and foxes, particularly on ticks. I investigate how abiotic factors and the host attributes influence tick abundance and prevalence on hosts. This chapter can be considered a model for investigating the relative importance of biotic and abiotic factors in parasite dynamics. Finally, in chapter 4 I focus on how hemoparasites and gastro-intestinal parasites affect coati health. There are few studies which have investigated the effects of multiple parasites on direct measures of the health parameters of free-ranging hosts. In this sense, this last chapter can also be viewed as a model for future studies focusing in the interplay between parasites and health of wild, free-ranging mammals.eng
dc.description.bibrefIncludes bibliographical referenceseng
dc.format.extentxi, 149 pageseng
dc.identifier.merlinb80170742eng
dc.identifier.oclc671485769eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/8870
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/8870eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertationseng
dc.rightsOpenAccess.eng
dc.rights.licenseThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 License.
dc.subject.lcshHost-parasite relationshipseng
dc.subject.lcshCoatis -- Healtheng
dc.subject.lcshFoxes -- Healtheng
dc.subject.lcshDusicyon -- Healtheng
dc.subject.lcshEctoparasitic infestationseng
dc.subject.lcshTickseng
dc.subject.lcshFloodplainseng
dc.titleLife-history and disease ecology of the brown-nosed coati (Nasua nasua) and the crab-eating fox (Cerdocyon thous) in the Brazilian Pantanaleng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineFisheries and wildlife sciences (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelDoctoraleng
thesis.degree.namePh. D.eng


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