[-] Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorLeshner, Glenneng
dc.contributor.authorKononova, Anastasia G., 1981-eng
dc.date.issued2010eng
dc.date.submitted2010 Summereng
dc.descriptionTitle from PDF of title page (University of Missouri--Columbia, viewed on August 20, 2010).eng
dc.descriptionThe entire thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file; a non-technical public abstract appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionDissertation advisor: Dr. Glenn Leshner.eng
dc.descriptionVita.eng
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.descriptionPh. D. University of Missouri--Columbia 2010.eng
dc.descriptionDissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- Journalism.eng
dc.description.abstract[ACCESS RESTRICTED TO THE UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI AT AUTHOR'S REQUEST.] The study explored how individuals cognitively process stereotype-consistent and stereotype-inconsistent information about African-American characters depicted in online news stories presented with different types of distracting advertisements and how they evaluate the elements of online media messages. Four individual difference factors, including cognitive control abilities and the habit of media multitasking, were included in the study as moderators. A 2 (Stereotype attribute) x 2 (Distraction) experiment indicated that participants failed to individuate African-American characters when news stories were presented on web pages with highly distracting advertisements. Light multitaskers had a higher ability to individuate story characters in the condition of low distraction than heavy multitaskers. High message distraction led to a lower level of story encoding and more negative evaluations of wwebeb pages. The ability to update memory with new items was found to positively correlate with the number of character attributes recalled by participants. Finally, the ability to shift tasks was a significant moderator of the message distraction effect on evaluations of stories, advertisements, and credibility judgments. The study findings are discussed and suggestions for future research are provided.eng
dc.format.extentxiv, 210 pageseng
dc.identifier.merlinb80170535eng
dc.identifier.oclc670434686eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/8889
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/8889eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcollectionUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertationseng
dc.rightsAccess is limited to the campuses of the University of Missouri.eng
dc.subject.lcshAfrican Americans in mass mediaeng
dc.subject.lcshStereotypes (Social psychology) in mass mediaeng
dc.subject.lcshNews Web siteseng
dc.subject.lcshHuman multitaskingeng
dc.titleThe effects of stereotypical depictions of African-Americans in web-based news stories presented in conditions with different levels of distractioneng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineJournalism (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelDoctoraleng
thesis.degree.namePh. D.eng


Files in this item

[PDF]
[PDF]
[PDF]

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

[-] Show simple item record