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dc.contributor.advisorFrisby, Craig L.eng
dc.contributor.advisorLembke, Erica S. (Erica Suzanne)eng
dc.contributor.authorLandon, Dorothy J., 1964-eng
dc.date.issued2010eng
dc.date.submitted2010 Summereng
dc.descriptionTitle from PDF of title page (University of Missouri--Columbia, viewed on August 20, 2010).eng
dc.descriptionThe entire thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file; a non-technical public abstract appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionDissertation advisor: Dr. Craig Frisby & Dr. Erica Lembke.eng
dc.descriptionVita.eng
dc.descriptionPh. D. University of Missouri--Columbia 2010.eng
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of the current research study is to describe the relationships between teacher concerns and level of "Response to Intervention" (RtI) use. Additionally, the study examined the influence demographic variables (gender, age, years of service, and level of degree) have on teacher concerns related to adopting RtI. The Concerns Based Adoption Model (CBAM, Hall & Hord, 1987; 2001) was used as a theoretical framework to conduct the study. The Stages of Concern Questionnaire (SoCQ),developed out of the CBAM, and Level of RtI Use Questionnaire (LRIUQ), developed by the researcher for this study, were used in the non-experimental, cross-sectional survey design to address the research questions. The SoCQ was used to evaluate concerns about innovation adoption by evaluating participant responses on each of seven scales, and the LRIUQ was used to evaluate teacher use of RtI based on a total scale score. Multiple regression analysis was used to evaluate relationships between concerns, RtI use, and teacher demographic characteristics. Overall, the study found that teachers who scored the highest on early stages of concern (0 and 1) scored low on RtI use, which supports Hall and Hord's (1987) concerns theory. In addition, gender status was found to potentially be predictive of teacher concerns. Males in this study were more likely to have Stage 1 and Stage 2 concerns, indicating that they are in early stages of RtI use. The findings from this study may have implications for how teachers are trained, which teachers are hired, how RtI is introduced to teachers and how they can be included in the process to facilitate greater buy-in, and how teachers are coached through professional developmenteng
dc.description.bibrefIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.format.extentviii, 107 pageseng
dc.identifier.merlinb80170572eng
dc.identifier.oclc670432999eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/8890
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/8890eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertationseng
dc.rightsOpenAccess.eng
dc.rights.licenseThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 License.
dc.subject.lcshResponse to intervention (Learning disabled children)eng
dc.subject.lcshTeachers -- Attitudeseng
dc.titleImpact of teacher concerns on response to intervention implementationeng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineEducation, school and counseling psychology (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelDoctoraleng
thesis.degree.namePh. D.eng


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