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dc.contributor.advisorPiper, Karen Lynnea, 1965-eng
dc.contributor.authorMitchell, Scott Alan, 1977-eng
dc.date.issued2010eng
dc.date.submitted2010 Summereng
dc.descriptionTitle from PDF of title page (University of Missouri--Columbia, viewed on August 23, 2010).eng
dc.descriptionThe entire thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file; a non-technical public abstract appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionDissertation advisor: Dr. Karen Piper.eng
dc.descriptionVita.eng
dc.descriptionPh. D. University of Missouri--Columbia 2010.eng
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation argues that Michael Ondaatje, Shyam Selvadurai, and Rushdie in their fiction present experiencing moments of mutual recognition instigated by physical connection as a possible means of ameliorating the alienating and Othering effects of Western colonialist discourse as profligated through labeling. The works studied - Ondaatje's Anil's Ghost and The English Patient, Shyam Selvadurai's Funny Boy, and Salman Rushdie's Shalimar the Clown and Midnight's Children - suggest that, despite the demise of colonialism, Western colonialist discourse still alienates nonwestern people from themselves and their communities, often through the process of naming. The writers discussed depict the mutual recognition of each other's subjectivity by two characters as a means of lessening this alienation. Together, these authors force us to question the prevalent focus on the verbal and the pessimism prevalent in much of postcolonial literature and theory. True, Western discourse continues to alienate and Other. But despite the negative influence of colonialist and neocolonialist discourses, Ondaatje, Selvadurai, and Rushdie illustrate in their fiction the possibility that individuals still retain some agency and avenues for ethic relationships with others and that these avenues are rooted in reciprocal recognition and physical connection.eng
dc.description.bibrefIncludes bibliographical referenceseng
dc.format.extentiv, 196 pageseng
dc.identifier.merlinb80170699eng
dc.identifier.oclc671484712eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/8893
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/8893eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertationseng
dc.rightsOpenAccess.eng
dc.rights.licenseThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 License.
dc.subject.lcshOndaatje, Michael, 1943- Criticism and interpretationeng
dc.subject.lcshSelvadurai, Shyam, 1965- Criticism and interpretationeng
dc.subject.lcshRushdie, Salman Criticism and interpretationeng
dc.subject.lcshPsychological fictioneng
dc.subject.lcshPostcolonialism in literatureeng
dc.title"This sweet touch" : alienation and physical connection in the works of Michael Ondaatje, Shyam Selvadurai, and Salman Rushdieeng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineEnglish (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelDoctoraleng
thesis.degree.namePh. D.eng


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