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dc.contributor.authorHendrickson, Maryeng
dc.contributor.authorJames, Harvey S. (Harvey Stanley)eng
dc.contributor.authorHeffernan, William D.eng
dc.coverage.spatialUnited Stateseng
dc.date.issued2006-09eng
dc.description.abstractWe consider the implications of trends in the number of U.S. farmers and food imports on the question of what role U.S. farmers have in an increasingly global agrifood system. Our discussion stems from the argument some scholars have made that American consumers can import their food more cheaply from other countries than it can produce it. We consider the distinction between U.S. farmers and agriculture and the effect of the U.S. food footprint on developing nations to argue there might be an important role for U.S. farmers, even if it appears Americans don't need them. For instance, we may need to protect U.S. farmland and, by implication, U.S. farmers, for future food security needs both domestic and international. We also explore the role of U.S. farmers by considering the question of whether food is a privilege or a right. Although Americans seem to accept that food is a privilege, many scholars and commentators argue that, at least on a global scale, food is a right, particularly for the world's poor and hungry. If this is the case, then U.S. farmers might have a role in meeting the associated obligation to ensure that the poor of the world have enough food to eat. We look at the consequences of determining that food is a right versus a privilege and the implications of that decision for agricultural subsidies as well as U.S. agriculture and nutrition policies.eng
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/8949eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.relation.ispartofcollectionAgricultural Economics publications (MU)eng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. College of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources. Division of Applied Social Sciences. Department of Agricultural Economicseng
dc.relation.ispartofseriesDepartment of Agricultural Economics working paper ; no. AEWP 2006-06eng
dc.source.harvestedhttp://dass.missouri.edu/agecon/research/workingpapers/aewp2006-6.pdfeng
dc.subjectdomestic food productioneng
dc.subjectagrifood systemseng
dc.subjectfood consumption trendseng
dc.subject.lcshFood consumption forecastingeng
dc.subject.lcshFarmerseng
dc.subject.lcshFood industry and tradeeng
dc.subject.lcshFood industry and tradeeng
dc.titleDoes the World Need U.S. Farmers Even if Americans Don't?eng
dc.typeWorking Papereng


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