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dc.contributor.advisorBuss, Kristin A.eng
dc.contributor.advisorBell, Debora J.eng
dc.contributor.authorLuebbe, Elizabeth J., 1979-eng
dc.date.issued2010eng
dc.date.submitted2010 Summereng
dc.descriptionTitle from PDF of title page (University of Missouri--Columbia, viewed on August 25, 2010).eng
dc.descriptionThe entire thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file; a non-technical public abstract appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionDissertation advisor: Dr. Kristin Buss and Dr. Debora Bell.eng
dc.descriptionVita.eng
dc.descriptionPh. D. University of Missouri--Columbia 2010.eng
dc.description.abstract[ACCESS RESTRICTED TO THE UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI AT REQUEST OF AUTHOR.] Fearful temperament in the toddler years is a well-established precursor to risk for childhood anxiety. Less is known about the mechanisms by which stability in risk occurs, or under which conditions stability may be moderated. Mothers may be particularly influential in the developmental trajectories of fearful children. In particular, maternal protective and intrusive behaviors have been identified as occurring with great frequency with fearful children, and this may result from children's elicitations of these behaviors. Certainly, not all mothers react to displays of fear with protection or intrusiveness. The current studies focused on the maternal characteristic of awareness, or mothers' abilities to predict their toddlers' fearful reactions to novelty, as a moderator of the association between fearful temperament and maternal behavior. Two studies examined the role of maternal awareness in early associations between fearful temperament and maternal behavior. In the first study, results suggested that mothers of more temperamentally fearful toddlers who more accurately predicted their fearful behavior demonstrated more protective behavior with them in novel tasks. In this moderated relation, protective behavior then predicted mother-reported anxiety and mothers' self-reported overprotection when children entered kindergarten. In the second study, this moderation was examined further for additional conditions that specify when it occurs. Maternal awareness moderated the relation between fearful temperament and protective behaviors displayed in lower-threat contexts but not high-threat contexts. This moderation occurred for boys but not for girls and when mothers reported having higher parent-centered goals and internal attributions for their children's shy behavior. Results are discussed within the developmental psychopathology perspective of anxiety development and prevention.eng
dc.description.bibrefIncludes bibliographical referenceseng
dc.format.extentvii, 158 pageseng
dc.identifier.merlinb80593628eng
dc.identifier.oclc673500478eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/9016eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/9016
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcollectionUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertationseng
dc.rightsAccess is limited to the campuses of the University of Missouri.eng
dc.subject.lcshFear in childreneng
dc.subject.lcshAnxiety in childreneng
dc.subject.lcshBehavior disorders in childreneng
dc.subject.lcshBashfulness in childreneng
dc.subject.lcshMother and childeng
dc.titleAssociations between maternal awareness and children's fearfulness and anxietyeng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychology (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelDoctoraleng
thesis.degree.namePh. D.eng


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