Framing a Descriptive Profile of a Transformed Apparel Industry: Apparel Import Intermediaries in the United States

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Framing a Descriptive Profile of a Transformed Apparel Industry: Apparel Import Intermediaries in the United States

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10355/9067

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dc.contributor.author Ha-Brookshire, Jung
dc.contributor.author Dyer, Barbara
dc.coverage.spatial United States
dc.date.accessioned 2010-11-17T15:27:33Z
dc.date.available 2010-11-17T15:27:33Z
dc.date.issued 2009
dc.identifier.citation Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management, Vol. 13 No. 2, 2009 pp. 161-178. en_US
dc.identifier.issn 1361-2026
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10355/9067
dc.description This is the post-print version of the article found in the Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management (http://www.emeraldinsight.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=jfmm). DOI 10.1108/13612020910957699 en_US
dc.description.abstract Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to confirm empirically the existence of a US apparel import intermediary (AII) identity crisis, and to provide a detailed descriptive profile of AIIs, differentiating them from apparel firms not primarily engaged in importing activities. Design/methodology/approach: A survey study was conducted using a national sample of US AIIs. Based on these firms' executives' responses, a firm identity issue was analyzed and a detailed profile of these firms' business characteristics was developed, using frequency comparisons. Findings: The study confirmed that US AIIs are currently experiencing an identity crisis, as nearly half of the study respondents misclassified themselves as apparel manufacturers or other business types, suggesting a significant distortion in US Economic Census data. The study also provided a descriptive profile of US AIIs, including geographic location and other business operation characteristics. Research limitations/implications: Three fourths of the survey respondents were located in the state of New York. Whether most US AIIs truly reside in New York cannot be known with certainty. Generalization of the study findings to a greater population should be cautious. Practical implications: Confirmation of an AII identity crisis suggests both aggregate and individual firm-level impacts on import activities. The study offers a new term, "intermediary", to replace the US Census Bureau term "wholesaler" to accurately reflect the industry's transformation. Originality/value: The study provides the first empirical support for a US AII identity crisis. The detailed profile of US AIIs offers industry data not available prior to this study. en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management en_US
dc.relation.ispartof Textile and Apparel Management publications (MU) en_US
dc.subject garment industry en_US
dc.subject economic globalization en_US
dc.subject apparel manufacturing en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Corporate image en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Crisis management en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Clothing trade en_US
dc.title Framing a Descriptive Profile of a Transformed Apparel Industry: Apparel Import Intermediaries in the United States en_US
dc.type Article en_US
dc.relation.ispartofcommunity University of Missouri-Columbia. College of Human Environmental Sciences. Department of Textile and Apparel Management


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