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dc.contributor.authorKoch-Laking, Ambereng
dc.contributor.authorPark, Michael K.eng
dc.contributor.authorTweed, Elizabeth M.eng
dc.date.issued2010-11eng
dc.description.abstractDirect-to-consumer advertising (DTCA) is associated with both higher fidelity to minimum treatment recommendations for depression and higher prescribing levels of antidepressants for depression and adjustment disorder (strength of recommendation [SOR]: B, small randomized controlled trial [RCT]). DTCA is also associated with higher prescribing rates for osteoarthritis, allergies, and hyperlipidemia (SOR: C, time-series analyses). No changes in prescribing rates have been noted for hypertension and benign prostatic hyperplasia (SOR: C, time-series analyses). Physicians often accommodate requests for DTCA medications (SOR: C, 4 surveys). In some cases, they wouldn't have considered such prescriptions for other similar patients (SOR: C, 3 surveys).eng
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Family Practice, 59(11) 2010: 649-650.eng
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/9083eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherFamily Physicians Inquiries Networkeng
dc.relation.ispartofClinical Inquiries, 2010 (MU)eng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. School of Medicine. Department of Family and Community Medicine. Family Physicians Inquiries Networkeng
dc.relation.ispartofseriesClinical inquiries ; volume 59, no. 11, 2010eng
dc.rightsOpenAccess.eng
dc.rights.licenseThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 License.eng
dc.subjectpharmaceutical marketingeng
dc.subjectprescribing rateseng
dc.subject.lcshDirect-to-consumer prescription drug advertisingeng
dc.subject.lcshDrugs -- Prescribingeng
dc.subject.lcshAdvertising -- Drugseng
dc.titleDoes DTC advertising affect physician prescribing habits?eng
dc.typeArticleeng


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