[-] Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorMartin, Barbara N. (Barbara Nell), 1952-eng
dc.contributor.authorMiguel, Aliciaeng
dc.coverage.spatialUnited Stateseng
dc.date.issued2008eng
dc.date.submitted2008 Falleng
dc.descriptionTitle from PDF of title page (University of Missouri--Columbia, viewed on November 12, 2010).eng
dc.descriptionThe entire thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file; a non-technical public abstract appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionDissertation advisor: Dr. Barbara N. Martin.eng
dc.descriptionVita.eng
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (p. 153-171).eng
dc.descriptionEd. D. University of Missouri--Columbia 2008.eng
dc.descriptionDissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- Educational leadership and policy analysis.eng
dc.description.abstractThere is vast amount of research that shows that parental involvement in children's education has been associated with children's school success, including higher academic achievement, better behavior, lower absenteeism, and more positive attitudes toward school (Overstreet, Dvine, Bevans, & Efreom, 2005). Attracting parents to schools has always been a challenge, especially in urban schools. Now, as schools face this charge of involving parents in their children's academic life through the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001, they face at the same time an increase in immigrant population. This adds new demands for creating just, equitable and successful schools (Arce et al., 2005, Cambron-McCabe & McCarthy, 2005; Mayers, 2006). School leaders must determine the best ways to attract parents, at the same time that they may have to redefine their concept of what parent involvement means (Henderson et al., 2007; Hoerr, 2005). The participants for this single case study consisted of 1) the principal of the school, 2) teachers of the school, 3) Latino immigrant parents whose children attend the school, and 4) the school secretary. The study findings revealed two themes that emerged from the actions of the principal: 1) Institutional Receptivity, and 2) Awakening to Self-Reliance. The implications of this inquiry for practice in education could impact both K-12 institutions and higher education institutions as they address the issues of diversity in schools, parental involvement, and giving voice to the marginalized, thus creating truly inclusive school climates.eng
dc.format.extent205 pageseng
dc.identifier.oclc681908517eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/9101
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/9101eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcollectionUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertations.eng
dc.subject.lcshSchool principals -- Attitudeseng
dc.subject.lcshSchool management and organization -- Parent participationeng
dc.subject.lcshTeachers of Hispanic Americans -- Attitudeseng
dc.subject.lcshParent-teacher relationshipseng
dc.subject.lcshHispanic American studentseng
dc.subject.lcshChildren of immigrants -- Educationeng
dc.titleAn examination of the impact of a principal's actions on the parent involvement of Latino immigrant parentseng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineEducational leadership and policy analysis (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelDoctoraleng
thesis.degree.nameEd. D.eng


Files in this item

[PDF]
[PDF]
[PDF]

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

[-] Show simple item record