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dc.contributor.advisorTrauth, Kathleeneng
dc.contributor.authorPeterein, Amber Lee Reitzeng
dc.date.issued2022eng
dc.date.submitted2022 Springeng
dc.description.abstractThere is very little information available to the public regarding 10-year annual chance pluvial flooding events. This leaves communities, individuals, stakeholders, and advocates with very few resources available to them to evaluate and determine the risks and health hazards associated with these more recurrent flooding events. Almost all research conducted on inland flooding events uses the 100-year annual chance event as the standard for investigating the intersection of flooding and environmental justice. While the 100-year has a greater potential for creating environmental hazards, this thesis looks at the gradual and subtle harmful effects these recurrent flooding events have on a community. This is accomplished by determining the demographic and social makeup of the people who reside within inland floodplains and evaluate if those factors meet the criteria of an environmental justice community -- a group of people within a community who endure a disproportionate burden of environmental hazard exposure; in this case, environmental health hazards attributed to recurring flooding. Additionally, hydraulic analyses were conducted to observe what new up- or down-stream water surface elevation conditions would be created by new infrastructure built across waterbodies under these flood conditions. The publicly available Geographic Information System (GIS) and datasets from the Federal Emergency Management Agency, the Missouri Spatial Data Information Service, and the National Flood Hazard Layer were used to establish a method to refine raw data into useable shapefiles that identify the 10-year flood inundation boundary. These shapefiles were then uploaded to EJScreen (EPA's environmental justice data management system) and used to evaluate the demographic data of the population that resides within the inundation zone. Additionally hydraulic and hydrologic analyses of rendered data were used to investigate different scenarios of infrastructure development--channel constriction and backwater rise potential along a 10-year flooded waterbody segment. These analyses reveal that a small increase in water surface elevation creates a large horizontal flood extent boundary expansion. The findings of this thesis raise awareness of the lack of available information pertaining to all aspects 10-year annual chance flooding events, such as population identification, inundation zones, and at-risk properties and parcels of land. In addition, the analyses identified the barrier that exists as many small or disadvantaged communities may not have access to the required technological expertise.eng
dc.description.bibrefIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.format.extentix, 84 pages : illustrations (color)eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/91528
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/91528eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.titleAn investigation of hydraulic and GIS processes to inform environmental justice decision-making regarding 10 percent annual chance flooding eventseng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineCivil and environmental engineering (MU)eng
thesis.degree.levelMasterseng
thesis.degree.nameM.S.eng


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