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dc.contributor.advisorCasteel, Stan W.eng
dc.contributor.authorFent, Genevieve M., 1975-eng
dc.date.issued2008eng
dc.date.submitted2008 Falleng
dc.descriptionThe entire dissertation/thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file (which also appears in the research.pdf); a non-technical general description, or public abstract, appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionTitle from PDF of title page (University of Missouri--Columbia, viewed on November 19, 2010).eng
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.descriptionVita.eng
dc.descriptionThesis advisor: Stan W. Casteel.eng
dc.description"December 2008"eng
dc.descriptionPh. D. University of Missouri-Columbia 2008.eng
dc.descriptionDissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- Veterinary pathobiology area program.eng
dc.description.abstract[ACCESS RESTRICTED TO THE UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI AT AUTHOR'S REQUEST.] The presence of arsenic and lead in the environment above the naturally occurring levels can have detrimental health effects on people living in these environments, especially children. The majority of this research focuses on gathering biokinetic information that will improve the risk assessment and remediation processes for these environments. The remainder of the work focuses on gathering preliminary biodistribution data for novel gold nanoparticle constructs being investigated for their potential uses in targeted cancer detection and treatment. The arsenic and lead experiments show that Pb is well absorbed following intratracheal instillation of Pb-contaminated soil and provide site-specific relative bioavailability data for the tested As-contaminated soils. This information will aid in the risk assessment/remediation decision making process for each material tested. The gold nanoparticle experiments show tissue distribution patterns for these nanoparticle constructs can be altered by changing the compound used to stabilize/coat the nanoparticles. This data will guide the future development of these potential targeted cancer imaging and treatment agents.eng
dc.format.extentviii, 109 pageseng
dc.identifier.oclc682160291eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/9187
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/9187eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcollectionUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertationseng
dc.rightsAccess is limited to the campus of the University of Missouri--Columbia.eng
dc.subject.lcshLead -- Pharmacokineticseng
dc.subject.lcshArsenic -- Pharmacokineticseng
dc.subject.lcshGold -- Pharmacokineticseng
dc.subject.lcshGold -- Therapeutic useeng
dc.subject.lcshNanoparticles -- Therapeutic useeng
dc.subject.lcshSoil pollution -- Physiological effecteng
dc.subject.lcshSoils -- Heavy metal contenteng
dc.titleBiodistribution of lead, arsenic, and gold nanoparticles following respiratory, oral and IV exposure of rats and swineeng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineVeterinary pathobiology area program (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelDoctoraleng
thesis.degree.namePh. D.eng


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