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dc.contributor.advisorInniss, Enos C. (Enos Charles)en_US
dc.contributor.authorKenny, Colleen M., 1986-en_US
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.date.submitted2010 Summeren_US
dc.descriptionTitle from PDF of title page (University of Missouri--Columbia, viewed on August 13, 2010).en_US
dc.descriptionThe entire thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file; a non-technical public abstract appears in the public.pdf file.en_US
dc.descriptionThesis advisor: Dr. Enos C. Inniss.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.en_US
dc.descriptionM.S. University of Missouri--Columbia 2010.en_US
dc.descriptionDissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- Civil engineering.en_US
dc.description.abstractTreatment facilities out of compliance with EPA regulations are often not using optimal chemical treatment. Determination of the most effective chemical type, combination and concentration can aid in reduction of disinfection by-product precursors. The effects of optimal chemical treatment using enhanced coagulation and enhanced softening was tested on three surface waters (two reservoirs and one lake sources), and one ground water (alluvial wells). Results indicated enhanced coagulation was more effective at removing DBP precursors from waters with higher initial UV-254 absorbance values and lower alkalinities while enhanced softening was more effective for waters with lower initial UV-254 absorbance values and higher alkalinities. In a number of cases, ferric salts outperformed aluminum salts at reducing the DBP formation potential. Redox potential measurements were added to the list of analyses to determine trends and the feasibility of using this parameter as an additional indicator of process efficiency. It is expected that Eh will trend as the inverse of pH. However, this research presents that under constant pH conditions, the Eh readings seem to indicate the destabilization and stabilization processes expected during the coagulation step in drinking water treatment. Comparison of the Eh readings from the start of various treatment stages to the end provides some indication of the effectiveness the enhanced coagulation or enhanced softening process has on the removal of organic precursors for disinfection by-products.en_US
dc.format.extentxii, 139 pagesen_US
dc.identifier.merlinb80705339
dc.identifier.oclc681953799en_US
dc.identifier.otherKennyC-071610-T55en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/9262
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaen_US
dc.relation.ispartof2010 Freely available theses (MU)en_US
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertations. Theses. 2010 Theses
dc.subject.lcshWater -- Purification -- Coagulationen_US
dc.subject.lcshWater -- Purification -- Disinfection -- By-productsen_US
dc.subject.lcshWater qualityen_US
dc.titleOptimization of chemical dosing in water treatment for enhanced coagulation/softening as it pertains to DBP removalen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineCivil engineering (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelMasterseng
thesis.degree.nameM.S.eng


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