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dc.contributor.advisorTemple, Daniel Howard, 1979-en_US
dc.contributor.advisorWescott, Daniel Jayen_US
dc.contributor.authorKnobbe, Sharon, 1984-en_US
dc.coverage.spatialJapan
dc.date.issued2010eng
dc.date.submitted2010 Summeren_US
dc.descriptionTitle from PDF of title page (University of Missouri--Columbia, viewed on Aug. 18, 2010).en_US
dc.descriptionThe entire thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file; a non-technical public abstract appears in the public.pdf file.en_US
dc.descriptionThesis advisor: Dr. Daniel Temple & Dr. Daniel Wescott.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.en_US
dc.descriptionM.A. University of Missouri--Columbia 2010.en_US
dc.descriptionDissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- Anthropology.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis thesis uses long bone diaphyseal morphology to test hypotheses regarding behavior and functional adaptation among Jomon period hunter-gatherers from the Yoshigo site in Japan. Cross-sectional properties of Jomon femora taken at midshaft were compared with the femora of hunter-gatherers from the Aleutian Islands. Cross-sectional properties from the mid-distal shaft of the humerus were compared between the Jomon and hunter-gatherers from the Aleutian Islands, California, and Georgia Coast. Sexual dimorphism was additionally assessed between the groups. Results suggest that the Jomon share a similar pattern of femoral robusticity (J) and shape (Ix/Iy) as Aleut hunter-gatherers. This study also found that Jomon humeri are significantly more robust than all comparative samples, but humeral shape is similar between the groups. In terms of sexual dimorphism, Jomon males and females are similar in both femoral and humeral robusticity and shape relative to the comparative samples, with Jomon males being more robust than females. Jomon and Aleut femoral robusticity and shape is associated with similarity in terrestrial mobility and terrain. The greater robusticity in Jomon humeri reflects intensive bimanual activities including swimming, rowing, digging tubers and throwing and lifting of fishing nets. Similarity in shape, but differences in robusticity between the sexes suggests similar direction of loading practiced with varying intensity.en_US
dc.format.extentviii, 121 pagesen_US
dc.identifier.merlinb80705455
dc.identifier.oclc681961143en_US
dc.identifier.otherKnobbeS-071910-T220en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/9278
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaen_US
dc.relation.ispartof2010 Freely available theses (MU)en_US
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertations. Theses. 2010 Theses
dc.subject.lcshBones -- Analysisen_US
dc.subject.lcshHuman remains (Archaeology)en_US
dc.subject.lcshHuman skeleton -- Analysisen_US
dc.subject.lcshJōmon cultureen_US
dc.titleReconstructing activity patterns in prehistoric Jomon people using long bone cross-sectional geometryen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAnthropologyeng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelMastersen_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US


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