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dc.contributor.advisorPearsall, Deborah M.eng
dc.contributor.authorO'Brien, Meghann, 1980-eng
dc.coverage.spatialAmazon River Regioneng
dc.date.issued2010eng
dc.date.submitted2010 Summereng
dc.descriptionTitle from PDF of title page (University of Missouri--Columbia, viewed on Aug. 19, 2010).eng
dc.descriptionThe entire thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file; a non-technical public abstract appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionThesis advisor: Dr. Deborah M. Pearsall.eng
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.descriptionM.A. University of Missouri--Columbia 2010.eng
dc.descriptionDissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- Anthropology.eng
dc.description.abstractThe Amazonian Slash-and-Burn Model and the Succession Model, both agentbased models, were developed to help address how much influence prehistoric Amazonian populations practicing slash-and-burn cultivation had on their surrounding environment and if different slash-and-burn cultivation strategies, i.e. short-fallow, bush-fallow, and long-fallow, could be identified based on the signatures left behind by these cultivation practices in subsequent forest composition and patterning. Both models were sensitivity tested to determine the validity and predictability of the parameters generated from ethnographic data. The outcome of this testing indicates that varying cultivation and fallow cycle lengths create different proportions of forest land, fallow land, and cultivation land on the total landscape through time. These results suggest that different prehistoric Amazonian slash-and-burn cultivation strategies could potentially be identified in paleoecological records based on the proportional signatures.eng
dc.format.extentviii, 339 pageseng
dc.identifier.merlinb80706599eng
dc.identifier.oclc682634034eng
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/9281
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/9281
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartof2010 Freely available theses (MU)eng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertations. Theses. 2010 Theseseng
dc.subject.lcshMultiagent systemseng
dc.subject.lcshIndians of South America -- Agricultureeng
dc.subject.lcshShifting cultivationeng
dc.subject.lcshClearing of landeng
dc.subject.lcshFallowingeng
dc.subject.lcshCropping systemseng
dc.titleThe identification of prehistoric Amazonian slash-and-burn cultivation practices using agent-based modelingeng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineAnthropology (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelMasterseng
thesis.degree.nameM.A.eng


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