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dc.contributor.advisorPiasecki, Thomas Michaelen_US
dc.contributor.authorRobertson, Brandon M., 1982-en_US
dc.date.issued2010eng
dc.date.submitted2010 Summeren_US
dc.descriptionTitle from PDF of title page (University of Missouri--Columbia, viewed on Aug. 19, 2010).en_US
dc.descriptionThe entire thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file; a non-technical public abstract appears in the public.pdf file.en_US
dc.descriptionThesis advisor: Dr. Thomas M. Piasecki.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.en_US
dc.descriptionM.A. University of Missouri--Columbia 2010.en_US
dc.descriptionDissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- Psychology.en_US
dc.description.abstractIndividual differences in hangover deserve study because they could be markers of important traits or processes such as loss of control, impulsivity, tolerance, or acute inflammatory responses. The Hangover Symptoms Scale (HSS) was developed to assess the frequency of 13 hangover-like symptoms experienced after drinking in the past year (Slutske et al., 2003). Cross-sectional analyses in a sample of college drinkers (Slutske et al., 2003) showed preliminary evidence for the validity of the HSS. The current investigation extended this work by examining the predictive validity of the HSS in two ecological momentary assessment (EMA) studies (Ns = 129 and 404) focused on alcohol use among smokers and nonsmokers. In both studies, participants carried electronic diaries in their natural environments to track their daily experiences. Each morning, the diary assessed any drinking behaviors from the prior night, the presence of hangover that morning, and current levels of hangover symptoms. Adjusting for sex and number of drinks in the episode, the HSS predicted diary endorsement of hangover (OR = 1.13, 95% CI = 1.09-1.18) in the larger sample only. A variety of analyses assessing whether the HSS identifies individuals who are especially susceptible to hangover produced mixed results. Findings are discussed in terms of their implications for the practical use of HSS scores in hangover research, the interpretation of HSS correlates, and the need to develop additional measures of individual differences in hangover susceptibility to advance hangover research.en_US
dc.format.extentvi, 68 pagesen_US
dc.identifier.merlinb80707415
dc.identifier.oclc682678051en_US
dc.identifier.otherRobertsonB-080210-T636en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/9284
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaen_US
dc.relation.ispartof2010 Freely available theses (MU)en_US
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertations. Theses. 2010 Theses
dc.subjecthangover scaleen_US
dc.subject.lcshAlcohol -- Physiological effecten_US
dc.subject.lcshDrinking of alcoholic beverages -- Psychological aspectsen_US
dc.subject.lcshTobacco -- Physiological effecten_US
dc.subject.lcshSmoking -- Psychological aspectsen_US
dc.subject.lcshDrugs -- Psychological aspectsen_US
dc.titleValidity of the hangover symptoms scale: evidence from two diary studiesen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyeng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaen_US
thesis.degree.levelMastersen_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US


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