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dc.contributor.advisorGompper, Matthew Edzarteng
dc.contributor.advisorEggert, Lori S. (Lori Suzanne)eng
dc.contributor.authorMowry, Rebecca A., 1984-eng
dc.coverage.spatialMissourieng
dc.date.issued2010eng
dc.date.submitted2010 Summereng
dc.descriptionTitle from PDF of title page (University of Missouri--Columbia, viewed on Aug. 18, 2010).eng
dc.descriptionThe entire thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file; a non-technical public abstract appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionThesis advisor: Drs. Matthew E. Gompper and Lori S. Eggert.eng
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.descriptionM.S. University of Missouri--Columbia 2010.eng
dc.descriptionDissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- Fisheries and wildlife.eng
dc.description.abstractExtirpated from Missouri by the 1930s, river otters (Lontra canadensis) were reintroduced by the Missouri Department of Conservation (MDC) from 1982-1992. Since the reintroductions, concerns over the legitimacy of otter trapping and the predator's effects on sport fish populations have sparked controversy. The MDC responded by increasing efforts to monitor river otter populations, using latrine site counts to measure relative abundance across several rivers in Missouri. However, the actual number of otters represented by these counts was unknown. To address this question, I extracted DNA from scat samples collected along 8 rivers in the winter and spring of 2009, using 10 microsatellite markers plus sexing markers to estimate the number and sex of otters. I then developed a model to estimate population size from latrine site index variables, observing that the number of scats per latrine and the density of active latrines across the river best predicted population size. I then used the genotypes to calculate the genetic diversity of the otter populations, evaluate the distribution of genotype clusters across the landscape, and track otter movements between latrines. Unexpected genetic similarities indicated that otters translocated to different areas may have come from the same source populations. Overall, this project has demonstrated the utility of genetic methods for estimating otter abundance, provided insight into the genetic diversity of the populations, and presented a model for inexpensive monitoring of river otter populations in the future.eng
dc.format.extentix, 80 pageseng
dc.identifier.merlinb80706472eng
dc.identifier.oclc682583934eng
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/9287
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/9287
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcollection2010 Freely available theses (MU)eng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertations. Theses. 2010 Theseseng
dc.subject.lcshExtinct animalseng
dc.subject.lcshNorth American river otter -- Reintroductioneng
dc.subject.lcshWildlife managementeng
dc.titleA genetic approach to determine river otter abundance in Missourieng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineFisheries and wildlife sciences (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelMasterseng
thesis.degree.nameM.S.eng


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