Paleozoological stable isotope data for modern management of historically extirpated Missouri black bears (Ursus americanus)

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Paleozoological stable isotope data for modern management of historically extirpated Missouri black bears (Ursus americanus)

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10355/9288

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dc.contributor.advisor Lyman, R. Lee en_US
dc.contributor.author Rosania, Corinne N., 1985- en_US
dc.coverage.spatial Missouri
dc.date.accessioned 2010-12-08T17:48:16Z
dc.date.available 2010-12-08T17:48:16Z
dc.date.issued 2010 en_US
dc.date.submitted 2010 Summer en_US
dc.identifier.other RosaniaC-070110-T221 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10355/9288
dc.description Title from PDF of title page (University of Missouri--Columbia, viewed on Aug. 20, 2010). en_US
dc.description The entire thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file; a non-technical public abstract appears in the public.pdf file. en_US
dc.description Thesis advisor: Dr. R. Lee Lyman. en_US
dc.description Includes bibliographical references. en_US
dc.description M.A. University of Missouri--Columbia 2010. en_US
dc.description Dissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- Anthropology. en_US
dc.description.abstract Human population growth and intensification of resource extraction during the 19th century changed the American landscape. Deforestation, residential sprawl and hunting activities impacted the behavior and sometimes the existence of native species. By the early 1900s, North American black bears (Ursus americanus) were extirpated from Missouri. Modern efforts to restore this species to the region are guided by the assumption that extant extra-local black bear ecology accurately depicts native Missouri ursid ecology. Paleozoological data provide the only means to test this assumption. Stable carbon and nitrogen isotope analysis of skeletal remains of ten late Holocene black bears from Lawson Cave in central Missouri reveals three aspects of native black bear diet: 1) Lawson Cave black bears are isotopically distinct from herbivores and carnivores; 2) There is no clear trend in black bear diet over the past 600 years; and 3) Lawson Cave black bear diet is not significantly different from that of modern black bears. Native Missouri black bears, as reflected by the Lawson Cave ursids, are no different from extralocal modern black bears in terms of diet. Therefore, these ecological data can be applied to future management and conservation planning regarding Missouri black bears by indicating appropriate regions (which can support the resource-use habits of black bears) for relocation programs. en_US
dc.format.extent vi, 65 pages en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher University of Missouri--Columbia en_US
dc.relation.ispartof 2010 Freely available theses (MU) en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Endangered species en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Black bear -- Reintroduction en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Wildlife management en_US
dc.title Paleozoological stable isotope data for modern management of historically extirpated Missouri black bears (Ursus americanus) en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US
thesis.degree.discipline Anthropology en_US
thesis.degree.grantor University of Missouri--Columbia en_US
thesis.degree.name M.A. en_US
thesis.degree.level Masters en_US
dc.identifier.merlin b80707890
dc.identifier.oclc 682720471 en_US
dc.relation.ispartofcommunity University of Missouri-Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertations. Theses. 2010 Theses


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