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dc.contributor.advisorCarroll, Mark M. (Mark McNeese)en_US
dc.contributor.authorMorman, Todd Allin, 1969-en_US
dc.coverage.spatialArizona -- San Francisco Peaks
dc.coverage.spatialNavajo Nation, Arizona, New Mexico & Utah
dc.date.issued2010eng
dc.date.submitted2010 Summeren_US
dc.descriptionTitle from PDF of title page (University of Missouri--Columbia, viewed on Aug. 18, 2010).en_US
dc.descriptionThe entire thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file; a non-technical public abstract appears in the public.pdf file.en_US
dc.descriptionThesis advisor: Dr. Mark M. Carroll.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.en_US
dc.descriptionM.A. University of Missouri--Columbia 2010.en_US
dc.descriptionDissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- History.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis study constitutes an original in-depth look at the first federal judicial case to test the scope of religious protections offered to Native American sacred places on public lands by the Religious Freedom Restoration Act of 1993, Navajo Nation v. Forest Service (2005). In doing so, it explores the efforts of the Hopi Nation 1962-2008 to prevent the expansion of the Snow Bowl Resort from despoiling the most sacred of Hopi places, Nuvatukyaovi, also known as the San Francisco Peaks, situated in the Coconino National Park. It places this enquiry within the larger political and historical context of the Hopi Nation and its relationship to the government of the United States from the late nineteenth century to 2008. While this investigation engages in a traditional legal analysis of Navajo Nation, it employs a distinctive existentialist-humanist analysis of the decision-making processes of the Forest Service administrators that generated the federal Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals decision. It concludes that the ordeal of the Hopi with the Snowbowl Resort reveals how a system of law and administrative regulation of public land, theoretically designed to harmonize relations between Native Americans and the needs of public lands management of the United States, was easily subverted by those with culturally-constructed predispositions to discount the differing sensibilities and spiritual concerns of the Native Americans whom their decisions affected.en_US
dc.format.extentiv, 148 pagesen_US
dc.identifier.merlinb80706423
dc.identifier.oclc682577513en_US
dc.identifier.otherMormanT-072210-T368en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/9292
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaen_US
dc.relation.ispartof2010 Freely available theses (MU)en_US
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertations. Theses. 2010 Theses
dc.subject.lcshUnited States -- Forest Serviceen_US
dc.subject.lcshKachinasen_US
dc.subject.lcshHopi Indians -- Religionen_US
dc.subject.lcshPueblo Indians -- Religionen_US
dc.subject.lcshZuni Indians -- Religionen_US
dc.subject.lcshNavajo Indians -- Religionen_US
dc.subject.lcshNavajo Nation, Arizona, New Mexico & Utah -- Trials, litigation, etcen_US
dc.titleKachinas are snowmakers: United States public land management and the Hopi quest for religious freedom, 1962-2008en_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHistoryen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHistoryeng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaen_US
thesis.degree.levelMastersen_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US


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