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dc.contributor.advisorHinnant, Amandaeng
dc.contributor.authorWachtel, Aimee, 1985-eng
dc.date.issued2010eng
dc.date.submitted2010 Summereng
dc.descriptionTitle from PDF of title page (University of Missouri--Columbia, viewed on Aug. 24, 2010).eng
dc.descriptionThe entire thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file; a non-technical public abstract appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionThesis advisor: Dr. Amanda Hinnant.eng
dc.descriptionM.A. University of Missouri--Columbia 2010.eng
dc.description.abstractSome scholars suggest that contemporary interest in tourism and foreign travel is partially the result of a modern "authenticity crisis." In other words, a disruption of the relationship between individuals and their sense of authenticity has inspired the pursuit of that lost authenticity through foreign destinations thought to still contain authentic elements. Accordingly, this qualitative frame analysis addressed the question of how the concept of authenticity is framed within three leisure travel magazines: Travel + Leisure, National Geographic Traveler, and Conde Nast Traveler. Briefly, it was found that there are four primary textual frames applying to the concept of authenticity, all of which contain sub-frames that further narrow their usage. For example: one primary frame identified is that of "authenticity as a way of life", which often manifests through the sub-frame of "authenticity as a rural way of life". These identified frames and sub-frames bore many important similarities and differences to past literature on authenticity and destination representation in tourism and travel literature, particularly that of MacCannell (1973, 1976), Cohen (1979, 1988), Chang and Holt (1991), Lutz and Collins (1993), Hall (1994) and Santos (2004). On a broader scale, this analysis also shows that these travel magazines primarily frame authenticity as being located within destinations and ways of life that reflect fewer aspects of the modern, urban or commercially developed world. The implication of this being that these travel magazines are, discursively, discouraging further development in the toured destination as it suits the needs of their audience--those seeking a lost authenticity.eng
dc.description.bibrefIncludes bibliographical referenceseng
dc.format.extentvii, 125 pageseng
dc.identifier.merlinb80707968eng
dc.identifier.oclc689052169eng
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/9297
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/9297eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartof2010 Freely available theses (MU)eng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertations. Theses. 2010 Theseseng
dc.rightsOpenAccess.eng
dc.rights.licenseThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 License.
dc.subject.lcshNational Geographic Travelereng
dc.subject.lcshCondé Nast Travelereng
dc.subject.lcshTravel + Leisureeng
dc.subject.lcshTravel -- Periodicalseng
dc.subject.lcshTourism -- Periodicalseng
dc.subject.lcshAuthenticity (Philosophy)eng
dc.titleThe real world : frames of authenticity in features articles of leisure travel magazineseng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineJournalism (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelMasterseng
thesis.degree.nameM.A.eng


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