[-] Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorWarren, Wesley C.eng
dc.contributor.authorCarroll, Rachel Anneng
dc.date.issued2022eng
dc.date.submitted2022 Falleng
dc.description.abstractMany species are vulnerable or on the verge of extinction as a result of increased habitat degradation and fragmentation. Conservation genetics has attempted to apply an understanding of species genetics to reduce the risk of severe population reductions with an assumed correlate to lower fitness. Better management strategies could be implemented if these principles can be used to determine the evolutionary context of endangered or vulnerable species. With sequencing technologies rapidly advancing and becoming more cost-effective, wildlife managers of both wild and zoo-managed species can now define the population genetics of their organism of interest to develop risk adverse mating plans that promote self-sustaining and stable populations. While studying wild population genetics is ideal for conservation, the availability of zoomanaged species can provide an opportunity to examine molecular diversity and trait outcomes in controlled environments for the typical smaller zoo cohorts. This genetic insight provides detailed maps of sequence variation and its putative functional impact, which will aid in disease control if it occurs in captive populations. Since all captive populations were once wild, estimates of these past wild sources of genetic variation can be extrapolated to update their diversity status in the wild and possibly promote species sustainability. In these studies, the fishing cat (Prionailurus viverrinus) is examined within the context of captive species conservation genetics. The Fishing Cat Species Survival Plan (SSP) group managing zoo-born individuals is facing management challenges due to its small population history and recent disease occurrence. More specifically, an increase in the occurrence of transitional cell carcinoma (TCC), a type of bladder cancer that affects older fishing cats, is now a concern for the SSP. Despite the fact that this type of bladder cancer has been observed in a variety of species, the exact cause is unknown. To investigate potential germline risk alleles linked to confirmed cancer cases, a reference genome was constructed, and whole genome sequences (WGS) of 11 fishing cats were generated. In addition, comparative population genetic analyses for the fishing cat, Asian leopard cat, and tiger were performed to test hypotheses about genetic fitness and answer questions about the health of the fishing cat zoo population, such as the prevalence of missense (amino acid-altering) and nonsense (loss-of-function) variants, nucleotide diversity, and runs of homozygosity. Ultimately, this research will help answer the question of whether these collated metrics of genetic fitness reflect great concern for the future of the zoo fishing cat population, including the possibility that germline risk alleles for TCC are present. Moreover, the first assessment of the fishing cat's genome diversity is conducted and compared its closest relatives, the Asian leopard cat (Prionailurus bengalensis).eng
dc.description.bibrefIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.format.extentx, 104 pages : illustrations (color)eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/95145
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/95145eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.titleGeneration of a reference genome to investigate population fitness and transitional cell carcinoma occurrence in the fishing cat (Prionailurus viverrinus)eng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineAnimal sciences (MU)eng
thesis.degree.levelMasterseng
thesis.degree.nameM.S.eng


Files in this item

[PDF]

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

[-] Show simple item record