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dc.contributor.advisorRice, Kevin B.eng
dc.contributor.authorLucas, Alyssa Leeeng
dc.date.embargountil12/1/2023
dc.date.issued2022eng
dc.date.submitted2022 Falleng
dc.description.abstractInvasive species, climate change, habitat destruction, and pesticides are severely threatening insect biodiversity on a global scale. In particular, invasive species are arriving in novel habitats at accelerating rates and are one of the greatest threats to biodiversity. In agricultural systems, invasive insects disrupt established integrated pest management programs, as growers primarily rely on chemical control. Japanese beetle (Popillia japonica Newman) is an invasive insect species that continues to spread throughout the Midwest. Soybean growers manage this pest with 3-4 additional insecticide applications per season, resulting in non-target effects on beneficial insects within agricultural systems. While many studies have quantified these non-target effects within agriculture, none have quantified the effects of these increased insecticides on insect populations in adjacent natural ecosystems. We investigate the effects of insecticide applications targeting Japanese beetle in soybean systems on insect abundance in adjacent forests. Treatments consisted of soybean fields treated with three weekly insecticide applications and untreated control fields. Samples were collected in field-adjacent forests at 4 sample sites along 40-meter straight-line transects. We compared the abundance of arboreal insects using yellow sticky traps deployed throughout forest canopies and ground-dwelling insects using pitfall traps. We observed significant reductions in overall insect abundance including key predator and parasitoid taxa in forests adjacent to insecticide-treated soybean.eng
dc.description.bibrefIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.format.extentx, 117 pages : illustrationseng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/95204
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/95204eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.titleIndirect effects of invasive insect management on forest insect abundanceeng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplinePlant Insect and Microbial Sciences (MU)eng
thesis.degree.levelMasterseng
thesis.degree.nameM.S.eng


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