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dc.contributor.advisorColbert, Janeng
dc.contributor.authorWood, Taryn B., 1987-eng
dc.date.issued2010eng
dc.date.submitted2010 Summereng
dc.descriptionTitle from PDF of title page (University of Missouri--Columbia, viewed on August 12, 2010).eng
dc.descriptionThe entire thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file; a non-technical public abstract appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionThesis advisor: Jan Colbert.eng
dc.descriptionM.A. University of Missouri--Columbia 2010.eng
dc.description.abstract[ACCESS RESTRICTED TO THE UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI AT REQUEST OF AUTHOR.] The ubiquitous nature of celebrity news and culture has been in place for decades, but its changing face is difficult to define. More specifically, reality TV celebrities are increasingly infiltrating the established celebrity news market, garnering amounts of media attention similar to a George Clooney or Jennifer Aniston -- not necessarily positive attention, however. Following the onslaught of Jon and Kate Gosselin media madness during the summer and fall of 2009, the researcher sought to find out just how much attention -- and what kind of attention -- reality stars are getting on the cover of People magazine. This large-scale content analysis sampled from covers of People published from 1985 to 2009, recording and analyzing both content-related and visual-related context. Results yielded a dramatic increase in appearances of qualifying reality TV subjects on People following the 1988 strike of the Writers Guild of America. Findings also pointed to little distinction in the editorial and visual treatment of reality TV subjects on the cover, in comparison to traditional celebrity subjects. Because of the risky, financially motivated nature of American magazine journalism, the importance of upholding existing branding and conventions on covers prevails, even in the face of a drastically changing aspect of the entertainment industry.eng
dc.description.bibrefIncludes bibliographical referenceseng
dc.format.extentv, 103 pageseng
dc.identifier.merlinb81029457eng
dc.identifier.oclc694773443eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/9523
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/9523eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertationseng
dc.rightsAccess is limited to the campuses of the University of Missouri.eng
dc.subject.lcshPeople (New York, N.Y. : 2002)eng
dc.subject.lcshPeople weeklyeng
dc.subject.lcshCelebrities -- Press coverageeng
dc.subject.lcshCelebrities -- Periodicalseng
dc.titleThe reality of celebrity journalism : a look at the changing presence of reality TV celebs in People magazineeng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineJournalism (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelMasterseng
thesis.degree.nameM.A.eng


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