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dc.contributor.advisorKing, Laura A. (Laura Ann)eng
dc.contributor.authorAbdelkhalik, Justin C., 1981-eng
dc.date.issued2010eng
dc.date.submitted2010 Summereng
dc.descriptionThe entire thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file; a non-technical public abstract, appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionTitle from PDF of title page (University of Missouri--Columbia, viewed on month day year)eng
dc.descriptionThesis advisor: Dr. Laura King.eng
dc.descriptionM.A. University of Missouri--Columbia 2010.eng
dc.description.abstract[ACCESS RESTRICTED TO THE UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI AT REQUEST OF AUTHOR.] The current studies looked to expand upon the wealth of knowledge in the social and behavioral sciences that link scarcity and value. Utilizing exemplar-cue theory and counterfactual reflection as theoretical models, both studies looked to expand upon the previous research by focusing on one's own life instead of topics in general. Since previous research found that mentioning death reminded people of the scarcity of life and therefore boosted life evaluations, this study looked to go one step further and see if this connection could be established without mentioning death. For study 1 the probability of one's existence was manipulated as being relatively high or low utilizing exemplar-cue theory. For study 2 participants wrote counterfactually or factually about their own birth (vs. a control external event). Both studies contained dependent measures that assessed meaning in life, life satisfaction and self-esteem. Study 1 was only partially founded with life satisfaction coming out with the intended findings. Study 2 demonstrated a more robust connection such that writing counterfactually about one's own life led to the highest life evaluations. Implications for the effects of scarcity information on life evaluations are discussed in texteng
dc.description.bibrefIncludes bibliographical referenceseng
dc.format.extentiv, 33 pageseng
dc.identifier.merlinb81080116eng
dc.identifier.oclc691285641eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/9529
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/9529eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertationseng
dc.rightsAccess is limited to the campuses of the University of Missouri.eng
dc.subject.lcshLifeeng
dc.subject.lcshSelf-esteemeng
dc.subject.lcshValues -- Psychological aspectseng
dc.subject.lcshScarcityeng
dc.titleLucky to be alive : scarcity effects on evaluation of lifeeng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychology (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelMasterseng
thesis.degree.nameM.A.eng


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