[-] Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorCarr, Zalyia
dc.date.issued2023
dc.description.abstractIn both mental and physical health, it is well known that early detection and treatment of problems is best. This is especially true when diagnosing and treating childhood mental disorders (Mandy, et.al, 2022). Some common childhood mental disorders are Autism, ADHD, and Specific Learning Disorders (SLD). While these are normally diagnosed in early childhood or adolescence, rates of early diagnosis likely differ amongst the demographics. For example, Autism and ADHD are more likely to be diagnosed in boys. Not because there are fewer girls with ADHD and Autism in the world, but because symptoms display differently in girls making it harder to detect (Wood-Downie, 2021). Black children have lower rates of diagnosis for ADHD than White children even though symptoms appear at similar rates (Coker, 2016). Black children are more often diagnosed with disorders such as Oppositional Defiant Disorder and Conduct Disorder than their White counterparts (Fadus, 2019). Studies that analyze signs and symptoms of these disorders aren’t diverse; participants typically come from Western cultures, preventing researchers from accounting for global differences. In studies that do ask for race, the participants are majority White. Studies are more likely to not ask for race, preventing researchers from identifying and analyzing potential trends among races (Qu, 2020). Because of these factors, I hypothesize that Black females are at higher risk for delayed diagnosis of mental health problems that typically first appear during childhood, such as Autism, ADHD, and SLD. An anonymous study was developed, online, and distributed on a college campus. It was designed to isolate data from the participants of interest, “females who identify with Autism, ADHD, and or a Specific Learning Disorder”. A descriptive analysis was conducted; however, this study was unable to identify a racial disparity in diagnosis due to a lack of Black participants. This study could provide exemplars of challenges females face in receiving an early diagnosis of Autism, ADHD, and SLD.eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/95303
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri -- Kansas Cityeng
dc.titleDiagnosis Differences in Childhood Mental Health Disorderseng
dc.typeThesiseng


Files in this item

[PDF]

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

[-] Show simple item record