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dc.contributor.advisorRautman, Marcus Louis, 1955-eng
dc.contributor.authorBevis, Elizabeth A., 1977-eng
dc.date.issued2010eng
dc.date.submitted2010 Summereng
dc.descriptionThe entire thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file; a non-technical public abstract, appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionTitle from PDF of title page (University of Missouri--Columbia, viewed on December 10, 2010).eng
dc.descriptionThesis advisor: Dr. Marcus Rautman.eng
dc.descriptionM.A. University of Missouri--Columbia 2010.eng
dc.description.abstract[ACCESS RESTRICTED TO THE UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI AT REQUEST OF AUTHOR.] Throughout antiquity, much of the population was employed in cloth-related industries from fiber production to laundering finished clothing. Fulling, (in a Roman context this includes both finishing cloth from the loom and laundering soiled clothing) and dying are particularly interesting as they are the most archaeologically visible textile trades. The technical bases and economic impact of these related trades are well studied and several debates in the last five years have raised interest in the social position of Roman cloth finishers. Interpersonal relationships between individuals in these trades are rarely studied, however, due to a perceived lack of evidence. This thesis attempts to contribute to those debates by surveying the available literary, epigraphic, and art historical evidence for the personal relationships of Roman cloth finishers and then developing a methodology to investigate opportunities for communication and social contact available to Roman cloth finishers through an analysis of the archaeological remains of cloth finishing workshops. The methodology developed in this work uses the biological limitations of the human field of view to determine what may have been visible from particularworkstations, in concert with historical and sociological studies of communication to establish the importance of non-verbal communication to work relationships in the Roman period. Visibility analysis is then applied to a selection of the well-preserved cloth finishing workshops from the imperial Roman cities of Pompeii and Ostia, which are evaluated comparatively to highlight the ways that the physical arrangement of the workspace can influence communication among the workers.eng
dc.description.bibrefIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.format.extentviii, 151 pageseng
dc.identifier.merlinb81080219eng
dc.identifier.oclc691293902eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/9534
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/9534eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertationseng
dc.rightsAccess is limited to the campuses of the University of Missouri.eng
dc.sourceSubmitted by University of Missouri--Columbia Graduate School.eng
dc.subject.lcshTextile fabrics, Romaneng
dc.subject.lcshTextile finishingeng
dc.subject.lcshTextile fabrics -- Dryingeng
dc.titleFrom loom to laundry : cloth finishers in the Roman cityeng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineArt history and archaeology (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelMasterseng
thesis.degree.nameM.A.eng


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