Use of reflection in medical education

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Use of reflection in medical education

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10355/9561

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dc.contributor.advisor Donaldson, Joseph Fetzer en_US
dc.contributor.author Griggs, Melissa D. en_US
dc.coverage.spatial Middle West
dc.date.accessioned 2011-01-14T16:44:11Z
dc.date.available 2011-01-14T16:44:11Z
dc.date.issued 2009 en_US
dc.date.submitted 2009 Spring en_US
dc.identifier.other GriggsM-110509-D343 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10355/9561
dc.description Title from PDF of title page (University of Missouri--Columbia, viewed on Sept 10, 2010). en_US
dc.description The entire thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file; a non-technical public abstract appears in the public.pdf file. en_US
dc.description Dissertation advisor: Dr. Joe F. Donaldson. en_US
dc.description Vita. en_US
dc.description Includes bibliographical references. en_US
dc.description Ph. D. University of Missouri--Columbia 2009. en_US
dc.description Dissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- Educational leadership and policy analysis. en_US
dc.description.abstract Physicians deal with complex and ill-structured problems and must reflect in order to function professionally while adapting to their patients' needs. This qualitative single case study explores the meaning and use of reflection in the professional preparation of physicians within the medical school of a Midwestern University. Along with a review of the types of reflection assessed (Aukes et al., 2007) and an analysis of Epstein's (1999) Levels of Mindfulness in guided student reflections, faculty and administrators were interviewed to learn more about their perspectives related to reflection. Assessing reflection in medical education is complicated by a lack of agreement about definitions and goals. Although scientific reflection and clinical reflection are more heavily assessed in written evaluations, faculty tended to discuss personal reflection (learning from experience) more during interviews. Most interviewees focused on one aspect of the phases of reflection (trigger, critical analysis, or outcome) rather than the entire process. Some were particularly uncomfortable with the idea of assessing an internal process. The use of Epstein's (1999) Level of Mindfulness was useful in assessing quality and focus of students' written narratives, however the levels do not work well as a continuum for this purpose and proved to be too broad to detect more subtle shifts in thinking across time. In addition, encouraging students to tell stories seems to stimulate deeper reflection. Using common definitions can help facilitate meaningful opportunities for reflection into the curriculum. en_US
dc.format.extent x, 239 pages en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher University of Missouri--Columbia en_US
dc.relation.ispartof 2009 Freely available dissertations (MU) en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Critical thinking en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Reflective learning en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Reflective teaching en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Medical education en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Medicine -- Study and teaching en_US
dc.title Use of reflection in medical education en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US
thesis.degree.discipline Educational leadership and policy analysis en_US
thesis.degree.grantor University of Missouri--Columbia en_US
thesis.degree.name Ph. D. en_US
thesis.degree.level Doctoral en_US
dc.identifier.oclc 694899577 en_US
dc.relation.ispartofcommunity University of Missouri-Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertations. Dissertations. 2009 Dissertations


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