The Role of Catholic Social Theory in Economic Policy

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The Role of Catholic Social Theory in Economic Policy

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Title: The Role of Catholic Social Theory in Economic Policy
Author: O'Connor, Jeremy J. (Jeremy Joseph), 1977-
Date: 2011-01-20
Publisher: University of Missouri--Kansas City
Abstract: This dissertation examines Catholic Social Theory (CST) in the context of its relationship to and impact on economic policy. CST emerged formally in the latter part of the nineteenth century in response to social changes and movements that were dividing the world, particularly in Western Europe and the United States. These movements included the emergence of both capitalism and socialism. To address the conflict that inevitably developed in this changing world, economic policies were instituted. These policies were intended, at least the argument goes to serve the common good and were based on theoretical concepts and perceptions. One question, from the perspective of CST is: are the policies in agreement with CST? The purpose of this study is to establish what relationship there is, if any, between selected U.S. economic policies and CST. Perhaps nowhere can this question be more fully addressed than in an examination of two important economic policy movements of the last century, New Deal economic policies and recent health care reform proposals in the U.S. Thus, this dissertation will examine the relationship between CST and these two areas of socio-economic policy. In particular, this dissertation examines the question: are the economic policies in question consistent with CST? If so, in what ways do they agree? If not, in what ways do they differ? The answers to these questions have importance not only iv from an economic theory and policy perspective, but from a social and religious perspective as well. There are nearly 70 million Catholics in the United States and approximately 1 billion worldwide. Thus, whether or not public policy is in agreement with CST is of consequence to a significantly large community of people.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10355/9610

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