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dc.contributor.advisorKahle, Louis G.eng
dc.contributor.authorWill, W. Marvin (Wilbur Marvin)eng
dc.date.issued1972eng
dc.date.submitted1972eng
dc.description.abstract"Seconds after midnight, November 30, 1966, a new trident-bedecked, gold and blue banner caught the prevailing Caribbean breeze signaling the birth of another new nation. The fact that this former British outpost, Barbados, was one of the smallest of the increasingly diminutive emerging nations and was faced with massive problems mattered little at this moment. As the attention of an estimated one-eighth of the island's total population focused on the Union Jack being lowered over greater Bridgetown's floodlit Garrison Savannah for the final time after 341 years of British rule, a murmur swept through the crowd--a murmur which swelled to an exhilarative roar as the new national symbol was raised into view. For that historical moment and, to some degree, in the days and nights of independence ritual and celebration which followed, Barbados was not only physically the "singular island" the tourist brochures proclaim, but spiritually singular as well. As politically cognizant Barbadians realized, however there was much more involved in hoped-for political development than instant independence euphoria or the minimum legal requisites of international statehood, e.g., "... a people, a territory, a government, and the characteristics of sovereignty." Nation-building and the other aspects of political development are slow, arduous processes involving man's integration with man as well as with governing authority and involving feelings and structures produced as much by historical accident as by efforts of honored and forgotten nation builders. Nevertheless such processes are of major significance to new nations for developmental attainment is often the difference between ordered change and stagnation or anarchy."--Pages 2-3.eng
dc.format.extentviii, 361 pages ; illustrationseng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/96506
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/96506eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertationseng
dc.rightsOpenAccess.eng
dc.rights.licenseThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 License.
dc.sourceDigitized a department copy.eng
dc.titlePolitical development in the mini-state Caribbean : a focus on Barbadoseng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplinePolitical science (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelDoctoraleng
thesis.degree.namePh. D.eng


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