[-] Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorvom Saal, Frederick S.eng
dc.contributor.authorKirkpatrick, James R., 1983-eng
dc.date.issued2009eng
dc.date.submitted2009 Summereng
dc.descriptionTitle from PDF of title page (University of Missouri--Columbia, viewed on September 15, 2010).eng
dc.descriptionThe entire thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file; a non-technical public abstract appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionDissertation advisor: Dr. Frederick vom Saal.eng
dc.descriptionVita.eng
dc.descriptionPh. D. University of Missouri--Columbia 2009.eng
dc.description.abstractMy dissertation examines two issues related to disruption of fetal growth: exposure to exogenous estrogenic chemicals and altered nutrition. My first set of studies was aimed at manipulating isoflavones in feed on serum estradiol levels in pregnant female CD-1 mice and their fetuses. Results were that fetal serum estradiol concentrations were elevated due to the absence of either isoflavones or soy protein in feed. Also, I show a difference in response to low doses of natural estrogens compared to manmade estrogens. I also show that isoflavones gave a nonmonotonic dose-response curve in that low levels of isoflavones elevated fetal estradiol levels and higher doses decreased fetal estradiol levels. The data show that the feed groups that had earlier onset of puberty in females were the same feed groups with higher estradiol during fetal life. These finding show that isoflavones have the potential to disrupt the fetal endocrine system. My last study involved examining placental transport in a crowded uterine horn. In the model used here, uterine crowding causes differential blood flow to fetuses. The fetuses with decreased blood flow relative to their siblings show decreased growth. I show here that the placenta does influence amino acid transport and that a reduced fetal growth is related to a reduced placental transport of nutrients. The importance of the crowded uterine model for the study of the effects of fetal nutrition on fetal growth is that this model incidence of IUGR in developed countries.eng
dc.description.bibrefIncludes bibliographical referenceseng
dc.format.extentx, 96 pageseng
dc.identifier.oclc696628488eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/9679
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/9679eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertationseng
dc.rightsOpenAccess.eng
dc.rights.licenseThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 License.
dc.sourceSubmitted by University of Missouri--Columbia Graduate School.eng
dc.subject.lcshFetus -- Growtheng
dc.subject.lcshFetus -- Nutritioneng
dc.subject.lcshEstrogen -- Toxicologyeng
dc.subject.lcshMice -- Pregnancyeng
dc.titleExamination of exogenous estrogenic chemical exposure and altered fetal nutrition in the CD-1 mouse fetuseng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineBiological sciences (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelDoctoraleng
thesis.degree.namePh. D.eng


Files in this item

[PDF]
[PDF]
[PDF]

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

[-] Show simple item record