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dc.contributor.advisorCox, Richard H., 1941-eng
dc.contributor.authorMoran-Miller, Kelli, 1977-eng
dc.date.issued2009eng
dc.date.submitted2009 Summereng
dc.descriptionTitle from PDF of title page (University of Missouri--Columbia, viewed on September 17, 2010).eng
dc.descriptionThe entire thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file; a non-technical public abstract appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionDissertation advisor: Dr. Richard H. Cox.eng
dc.descriptionVita.eng
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.descriptionPh. D. University of Missouri--Columbia 2009.eng
dc.descriptionDissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- Educational and counseling psychology.eng
dc.description.abstractAlthough post-Title IX sport participation rates for girls and women have skyrocketed, the percentages of women in sport leadership roles have plummeted. Today, women hold only 44% of head coaching positions in women's intercollegiate athletics, compared with over 90% before the passage of Title IX. Few studies have examined how the perceptions of prospective coaches, and specifically female student-athletes, may impact this downward trend. The purpose of this study is to examine the impact of specific contextual factors (i.e., coach gender, female coaching role models, and perceived barriers) on coaching self-efficacy, outcome expectations, and career interest in coaching using social cognitive career theory as the theoretical framework. Participants were 205 predominantly White, heterosexual female student-athletes. Path analysis indicated that both contextual supports and barriers predicted coaching self-efficacy and that coaching self-efficacy predicted outcome expectations. Additionally, career interest in coaching was predicted by coaching self-efficacy, outcome expectations, and contextual supports and barriers. Post hoc model modifications indicated that a model portraying barriers and supports as both directly and indirectly (through their impact on self-efficacy) linked to career interest in coaching produced a better fit to the data than a model specifying only an indirect link to interest. Practical implications are discussed, as well as suggestions for further research in this relatively unexplored area of inquiry.eng
dc.format.extentviii, 86 pageseng
dc.identifier.oclc696790146eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/9682
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/9682eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartof2009 Freely available dissertations (MU)eng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertations. Dissertations. 2009 Dissertationseng
dc.subject.lcshLeadership in womeneng
dc.subject.lcshCollege sports for womeneng
dc.subject.lcshWomen coaches (Athletics)eng
dc.subject.lcshWomen athleteseng
dc.titleWhere are the women in women's sports?: predictors of female athletes' interest in a coaching careereng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineEducational, school and counseling psychology (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelDoctoraleng
thesis.degree.namePh. D.eng


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