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dc.contributor.advisorFlores, Lisa Y.eng
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, Maya Milaneng
dc.date.issued2023eng
dc.date.submitted2023 Summereng
dc.description.abstractWithin the past decade, there has been increased attention to discrimination and racism toward communities of color. In response, many Black and African American adults engage in activism and civic disruption (Szymanski, 2012) to fight against societal structures that oppress marginalized communities. Conversely, activism can be physically and emotionally taxing, especially for people of color who engage in activism related to their racial/ethnic identity (Linder et al., 2019). At the collegiate level, there is a lack of research about the mental wellness of Black students who experience a hostile campus racial climate and advocate for changes at their university. Utilizing a Constructivist Grounded Theory approach with a critical ideology and radial healing framework, this study explored how Black students engaged in identity-based activism take care of themselves when they experience general, race-related, and social justice-related stressors. Findings reveal that Black college students who engage in social justice experienced stressors due to institutional factors, like a hostile campus racial climate, and factors related to student life, such as navigating the COVID-19 pandemic and systemic racism. Furthermore, Black students are shifting the existing mental health stigma and are open to mental health support. Due to a lack of university support and access to Black and African American counselors, Black students seek help from their community and utilize self-coping strategies to support their well-being.eng
dc.description.bibrefIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.format.extentvi, 149 pageseng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/97009
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/97009eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertationseng
dc.titleUnderstanding race, mental health, and social justice among Black college studentseng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineEd, School and Counseling Psychology (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelDoctoraleng
thesis.degree.namePh. D.eng


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