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dc.contributor.advisorSorenson, M. W.eng
dc.contributor.authorPrieto, Andrew Anthonyeng
dc.date.issued1971eng
dc.descriptionIncludes vita.eng
dc.description.abstract"The study of animal behavior has erroneously been described as the newest branch of the zoological sciences. In reality the study of behavior began with man's initial observations of the animals around him since his survival depended upon his knowledge of these animals and their behavior. With the development of agriculture man's dependence on wild animals decreased. A secondary interest in the behavior of animals developed much later and may be related to man's basic curiosity. Today, animal behavior is considered as both a basic science and a practical science. Some of the earliest written accounts of animal behavior were those of Aristotle. In his morphological descriptions of animals, Aristotle often included observations on their behavior; however, a true behavioral science did not emerge until late in the 1800's."--Introduction.eng
dc.description.bibrefIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.format.extentv, 149 pages : illustrationseng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/98348
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/98348eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertationseng
dc.rightsOpenAccess.eng
dc.rights.licenseThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 License.
dc.sourceDigitized a department copy.eng
dc.titleThe ethology of the Arizona Chuckwalla (Sauromalus obesus tumidus)eng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineZoology (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelDoctoraleng
thesis.degree.namePh. D.eng


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