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dc.contributor.advisorBooker, Jordaneng
dc.contributor.authorJohnson, Chloe Linetteeng
dc.date.embargountil12/1/2024
dc.date.issued2023eng
dc.date.submitted2023 Falleng
dc.description.abstract[EMBARGOED UNTIL 12/1/2024] Sensory processing sensitivity, characterized by heightened central nervous system reactivity and deep cognitive processing of external and internal stimuli, is relevant for adjustment and functioning during the college career (Aron & Aron, 1997). Broadly, higher endorsements of sensory processing sensitivity relate to greater emotional and psychological reactivity to both positive stimuli and negative settings, implying the innate trait can operate as a risk or resilience factor depending on context (Acevedo, 2020; Aron, 2001; Aron et al., 2012; Bas et al., 2021). Though, questions remain on the appropriateness and utility of some scales for sensitivity, and there remain many populations where sensitivity has not been as heavily studied. This study investigated the structural and discriminant validity of the newly formed Sensory Processing Sensitivity Questionnaire (SPSQ; De Gucht et al., 2022). Further, this project addressed direct associations between sensory processing sensitivity and psychological outcomes as well as moderating effects of recent affect on these linear associations. 774 students from a large, midwestern, public university (M age = 18.91, SD = 2.19; 63.78 percent cisgender women) were recruited to complete a questionnaire including self-reports of individual differences (i.e., sensitivity, temperament, and personality), psychological adjustment (i.e., flourishing and life satisfaction), and psychological adversity (i.e., depression and anxiety symptoms). Confirmatory factor analyses supported the validity of the SPSQ for an American college sample, yet measurement invariance tests revealed significant response variance across gender and racial groups. Further, bivariate correlations revealed modest correlations between sensitivity and other individual differences but little to no shared variance. Regressions showed mixed results regarding direct and moderating effects of sensitivity on psychological outcomes.eng
dc.description.bibrefIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.format.extentii, 111 pages : illustrations (color)eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/98804
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/98804eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertationseng
dc.titleSensory processing sensitivity among college adults : evidence of validity and ties to psychological functioningeng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychology (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelMasterseng
thesis.degree.nameM.A.eng


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